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NEW RESEARCH: BANKS FAILING TO DELIVER FOR SMES

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banks failing to deliver for smes

Smallest companies particularly unhappy with services

  • Only 48% of micro-enterprises are happy with their business banking.
  • 59% of micro-enterprises believe business growth would be significantly improved with specialist banking services, but most are not being offered them.
banks failing to deliver for smes

banks failing to deliver for smes

Global software & IT specialist Comarch has today unveiled exclusive new research, “Banking on Tech City”, showing that while banks are getting the basics right for SMEs they are still failing to deliver the specialist services these companies need to thrive. The research surveyed companies in Tech City, the hub of mostly SME digital enterprises and start-ups in East London that has become the poster child of government efforts to drive economic growth.

Other key findings include:

  • Just over half (53%) of respondents are happy with their business banking.
  • Banks are getting the basics right. Companies think banks are helpful (69%), trustworthy (72.5%) and are happy with their lending policies when it comes to getting credit (63%)
  • Banks are not delivering on specialist value added services. Of the companies surveyed, 27.5% had been offered payment automation and 8% had been offered cash flow forecasting.

The research comes after concerns first raised by Comarch earlier this year that banks are simply rebadging basic retail banking services for SMEs and are not offering dedicated business services which could help them grow their business. This concern would appear to be borne out by the fact that only 48% of surveyed micro-enterprises, those who employ fewer than ten staff, are unhappy with their current business banking service.

Comarch gained access to over 50 Tech City companies to ask them about the service they received from their banks. While there are areas where banks are getting it right, especially in making credit available, there are still areas of concern where banks could do more to support SMEs.

“SMEs make up 99.9% of all UK private enterprises[1] and yet they are still getting a poor service from their banks. Services such as cash flow forecasting and payment automations are vital for SMEs to control their finances and streamline internal processes. Despite the dedicated services not being offered, many of the companies we spoke to said they would be willing to pay for them. Only 7% of micro-enterprises had been offered cash-flow forecasting, for example, but more than one-in-four would be willing to pay for them.” said Eva Jasiecka, Managing Director UK of Comarch.

“For micro-enterprises, it’s crucial that banking should be quick and easy, allowing them the maximum amount of time to get on with running their business and driving growth. If these services are not being offered, it’s little wonder that more than half are dissatisfied with their bank. The demand for the services is there and, crucially, so is technology required to deliver them.

“2011 report by Accenture[2] said that SMEs were “fiercely loyal” to their banks. New regulations for account switching have made it easier for SMEs to move banks. This presents a major challenge to customer loyalty. The banks that start to invest in the IT to offer these services will be the ones who win and retain SME business,” concluded Jasiecka.

To download a copy of the report, including more detailed findings and analysis and key recommendations to help banks deliver for high growth and SME business, please go to www.corporatebanking.comarch.com/banking-on-tech-city

 About Comarch for Banking

Comarch is a global IT company employing more than 4,000 people. Comarch works with major financial institutions from banking, insurance and capital market verticals such as BNP Paribas Group, Citigroup, ING Group, Rabobank and UniCredit Group in more than 20 countries. With 17 year’s experience in the banking sector Comarch delivers proven solutions, designed specifically to support the business banking market. With its ‘mobile first’ philosophy and vast experience in vertical markets, Comarch works with banks to deliver innovative services that help their banking customers grow, unlocking new revenue streams and reducing costs to deliver rapid RoI.

[1] Federation of Small Business (2013)
[2] Next Generation SME Banking, Accenture (2011).

Banking

Hackers can now empty out ATMs remotely – what can banks do to stop this?

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Hackers can now empty out ATMs remotely – what can banks do to stop this? 1

By Elida Policastro, Regional Vice President for Cybersecurity, Auriga

In 2010, the late Barnaby Jack famously exploited an ATM into dispensing dollar bills, without withdrawing it from a bank account using a debit card. Fast forward to the present day, and this technique that is now known as jackpotting, is emerging as a threat and is growing as an attack on financial services. Recently, a hacking group called BeagleBoyz in North Korea have caught the attention of several U.S. agencies, as they have been allegedly stealing money from international banks by using remote hacking methods such as jackpotting.

The reality behind jackpotting

Jackpotting is when cybercriminals will use malware to trick their targeted ATM machine into distributing cash. As this criminal method is relatively easy to commit, it is becoming a popular tool for cybercriminals, and this trend will sure continue in 2021, unless financial organisations implement policies to prevent this and protect consumers.

During this difficult time, when access to cash has never been more important to banking customers, it is imperative that banks give their customers reliable ATMs that work, 24/7, 365 days a year. However, due to the sensitive data that ATMs possess, such as credit card or PIN numbers, they have now become a profitable object for cybercriminals to manipulate. As cybercriminals have been evolving in their efforts of attacking the IP in ATM machines, we will definitely see more jackpotting stories emerge in the coming months, especially with the large return on investment.

How criminals exploit the vulnerabilities found in ATMs

Since ATMs are both physically accessible and found in remote locations with little to no surveillance, this gives an opportunity for criminals to carry out jackpotting, especially with the software vulnerabilities that may exist in many ATMs.

ATM machines have been easily manipulated due to the outdated and unpatched operating systems that they run on. If banks wanted to resolve this issue and update these systems, it would take large amounts of time and money to do so. However, some banks do not have such resource and because of this, cybercriminals take advantage by penetrating the software layers in ATMs and exploiting the hardware to dispense cash.

How can banks tackle this?

As the sector has a complex technical architecture, banking organisations will have to make sure that they have control over the transactions that take place, and this includes the management of security when it comes to communication between various actors. When financial organisations are reviewing their ATM infrastructure, they will also need to protect their most vulnerable capabilities within their cybersecurity. Banks, for example, can encrypt the channels on the message authentication, in the event bad actors try to tamper with their communications.

Because ATM networks need to be available 24/7, banks not only, need to implement greater protection over their systems, but they need to do so with a holistic approach. One action that banks can take is to implement a centralised security solution that protects, monitors and controls their various ATM networks. This way banks can control their entire infrastructure from one location, stopping fraudulent activities or malware attempts on vulnerable ATMs.

Another way for banks to reduce the risk of jackpotting attacks is to update their ATM hardware and software. To do this, they will need to closely monitor and regularly review their machines in order to spot any emerging risks.

What the future holds for the banking industry

As confirmed by the warnings from the U.S. agencies, jackpotting remains a very serious threat for financial organisations. Evidence has also emerged, which shows hackers are becoming more innovative in their tactics. It was reported last year, for example, that hackers stole details of propriety operating systems for ATMs that can be used to form new jackpotting methods.

The emergence of jackpotting highlights the need for banks to actively work to protect their customers’ personal information and critical systems now and for the foreseeable future. In order to stay secure and reduce the risk of attacks, they will need to put in place the aforementioned solutions, which include updating their ATM hardware and software as well as closely monitoring and regularly reviewing their ATMs. As cybercriminals continue to become more innovative in their ways of attacking the machines, the issues mentioned will only continue to rise if they are not addressed. Although the method of jackpotting requires little action from cybercriminals, if financial organisations can implement a layered defence to their ATM security, they can stop themselves from becoming another victim to this type of attack in the future.

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Banking

SoftBank Vision Fund set for new portfolio champion with Coupang IPO

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SoftBank Vision Fund set for new portfolio champion with Coupang IPO 2

By Sam Nussey and Joyce Lee

TOKYO/SEOUL (Reuters) – SoftBank’s $100 billion Vision Fund is poised to have a new number-one asset in its portfolio with the upcoming floatation of top South Korean e-tailer Coupang, furthering a turnaround that has seen the fund yo-yo from huge losses to record profit.

The $50 billion target valuation that Reuters reported this month would likely see the decade-old firm surpass recently listed U.S. food deliverer DoorDash Inc on a roster of assets that also includes stakes in TikTok parent ByteDance and ride-hailers Grab and Didi.

The Vision Fund built up its 37% stake in Coupang for $2.7 billion, mostly at an $8.7 billion post-money valuation, a person familiar with the matter said. The fund is not expected to sell shares in the initial public offering (IPO) that Coupang filed for in New York, the person said, declining to be identified as the information was not public.

SoftBank Group Corp and Coupang declined to comment.

Achieving a $50 billion valuation would add to good news for the fund which is bouncing back from an annual loss in March. This month, it announced record quarterly profit, driven by the listings of DoorDash and home seller Opendoor Technologies Inc and share price rise of ride-hailer Uber Technologies Inc.

HIT PARADE

The fund has written big cheques for late-stage startups to fuel rapid growth, with two-thirds of the value of its portfolio concentrated in 10 assets including Coupang.

The 10 include 25% of British chip designer Arm – to be sold to Nvidia Corp pending regulatory approval – but not stakes in high-profile stumbles like office-sharing firm WeWork.

The fund’s largest assets include its 22% stake in DoorDash, whose share price has doubled since the firm’s December IPO, sending its market capitalisation to $65 billion.

FACTBOX: Vision Fund’s investment hit parade

SoftBank initially invested in Coupang in 2015, adding it to a stable of e-commerce hits that included 25% of China’s Alibaba Group Holding Ltd, before placing it under the fund.

The e-tailer has grown rapidly during stay-home policies while the COVID-19 pandemic has forced other portfolio firms like Indian hotel chain Oyo to scramble to preserve cash.

Analysts see Coupang’s $50 billion valuation as feasible given its first-mover status and as it expands beyond replacing brick-and-mortar retail with a rising number of online channels.

It is the biggest e-tailer in South Korea that directly handles inventory, with 2020 purchases at about 21.7 trillion won ($19.62 billion), showed data from WiseApp.

“The market’s assessment isn’t exaggerated,” said analyst Park Eun-kyung at Samsung Securities. “Coupang’s market leadership is a premium factor.”

($1 = 1,106.1800 won)

(Reporting by Sam Nussey in Tokyo and Joyce Lee in Seoul; Editing by Christopher Cushing)

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Banking

Five things to look out for in HSBC strategy update

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Five things to look out for in HSBC strategy update 3

By Alun John

HONG KONG (Reuters) – HSBC Holdings PLC will update its “transformation” plan announced a year ago on Tuesday, when the Asia-focussed lender also reports annual results.

As part of its latest strategy, the bank said in February last year it would shrink its investment banking operations and revamp its businesses in the United States and Europe resulting in 35,000 jobs being cut.

HSBC’s pretax profits for 2020 is expected to fall 38% to $8.3 billion, according to analysts’ estimates compiled by the bank, because of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Here are five key things to look out for in the new plan to revive its growth —

1. How will HSBC boost fee income?

The bank has promised details of its plans to make more money from the fees it earns from selling products to customers than it does by pocketing the difference between the interest rates it offers savers and charges borrowers.

This could involve selling more products to wealth management clients, charging corporate clients in different ways, and maybe even charging retail clients for basic banking services.

2. What do the plans to double down on China and Asia mean?

HSBC intends to refocus resources from elsewhere on what it calls its “high returning Asia business”, but investors want to know what this means in practice for markets and business lines.

Politics could make this harder. HSBC has been attacked by British lawmakers for assisting Hong Kong police with investigations into pro-democracy activists, including freezing some bank accounts.

CEO Noel Quinn said last month the bank had to comply with police requests and he could not “cherry-pick which laws to follow”.

3. Will HSBC resume paying a dividend?

HSBC has not announced a dividend since the third quarter of 2019, on instructions from the Bank of England. This angered retail investors in Hong Kong who tried unsuccessfully to have the policy changed.

The regulator has since lifted the ban, and British rival Barclays said Thursday it would pay a dividend of one pence a share. However, despite beating analyst expectations with its 2020 results, Barclays shares fell as a vague outlook without profit targets left investors underwhelmed.

HSBC investors will be looking beyond the day’s numbers for concrete commitments towards improved returns and a more positive outlook for key economies.

4. How will HSBC shrink its U.S. and European footprint?

HSBC’s French high street banking operations are up for sale, but it has had trouble finding a buyer.

The market is due an update on whether HSBC has managed to find a buyer on terms it will accept, or whether it will seek to wind the business down more gradually.

HSBC will also give details of how it will accelerate its existing efforts to shrink assets, staff and branches in the U.S., which accounted for 0.5% of the group’s pre-tax profit in the first half of last year.

5. More job cuts on the way?

HSBC employed 307,000 people at the end of 2010. The bank’s management said last year it was aiming to reduce the headcount of 235,000 closer to 200,000 by 2023. Investors want to know whether the new plan will mean deeper cuts. Nearly every new strategy launched by HSBC in the past decade has resulted in fewer people being employed by the bank.

(Reporting by Alun John; Editing by Sumeet Chatterjee & Shri Navaratnam)

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