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Bitcoin will lose 50% of its market share to Ethereum in five years

Bitcoin will lose 50 per cent of its cryptocurrency market share to Ethereum within five years, states an influential tech expert and business analyst.

The comments from Ian Mcloed, from Thomas Crown Art, the world’s leading art-tech agency that he established with renowned art dealer, Stephen Howes, comes as Ethereum, the world’s second-largest cryptocurrency by market cap, began a price recovery on Friday after being hit hard with a major sell-off in recent weeks.

Bitcoin – the biggest digital currency – had also been in decline, but it bounced back quicker than its nearest competitor.

Indeed, Ethereum had crashed 85 per cent overall this year.

However, Ethereum is regained ground late last week, jumping almost 14 per cent after its most recent plunge, only find itself trading again 10 per cent lower once more in the past 24 hours.

What is happening? And what does the future hold for Ethereum?

Mr Mcloed observes: “Turbulence is a regular, and sometimes welcome, feature of the crypto sector.  Therefore, the Ethereum rebound was, and is, inevitable.

“But not only do we think it will rebound considerably before the end of 2018, I believe that over the longer time it will significantly dent Bitcoin’s dominance.

“In fact, I think we can expect Bitcoin to lose 50 per cent of its cryptocurrency market share to Ethereum, its nearest rival, within five years.”

Why is he so confident?

“Simply, Ethereum offers more uses and solutions than Bitcoin, and it’s backed with superior blockchain technology,” says Mr Mcloed.

“This is why we use Ethereum’s blockchain in our art business.  It has allowed us to create a system to use artworks as a literal store of value; it becomes a cryptocurrency wallet.

“It also solves authenticity and provenance issues – essential in the world of art.  All our works of art are logged on the Ethereum’s blockchain with a unique ‘smART’ contract.”

Last month, Stephen Howes explained: “Using this cutting-edge technology, the art world can eradicate one of its biggest and most expensive problems – forgery – and can protect artists, galleries, and private owners and collectors.”

Ian Mcloed concludes: “Whilst there will continue to be peaks and troughs in the wider cryptocurrency market, due to its inherent strong core values, Ethereum will steadily increase in value in the next few years and beyond.

“Unless Bitcoin does more now to tackle scalability issues, and improves the technology it runs on, we cannot see how it can catch up with Ethereum over the next five years or so, when the crypto market will be even more mainstream.

“Ethereum is already light years ahead of Bitcoin in everything but price – and this gap will become increasingly apparent as more and more investors jump into crypto.”