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A blockchain solution for global peer-to-peer lending

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A blockchain solution for global peer-to-peer lending

By David Bradley-Ward, CEO, Ablrate

The financial services industry has always been primed for disruption, with long-standing challenges just waiting to be solved by new technologies. Enter blockchain.

Of all the latest technologies to emerge, blockchain has one of the most promising futures.

It can reduce the friction and costs associated with cross-border transactions and loaning which, until recently, has been governed by the monetary policies of central banks.

A blockchain solution for global peer-to-peer lending is on the horizon, adding an exciting layer to an already booming sector which is expected to reach the $1 trillion mark by 2025.

The problem is, some aren’t excited by blockchain’s arrival. Experiencing Déjà vu? It’s easy to be transported back to the 1990s when the Internet was dismissed as just a “wasteland of unfiltered data”.

History does repeat itself and we’re seeing with blockchain today it’s up to the brave early adopters to test the water while others look on in anticipation. Like the firstrise of the internet, this second generation promises to disrupt business models and transform value exchange as we know it.

“That’s capitalism”

David Bradley-Ward

David Bradley-Ward

While it’s the best system we’ve found so far to run the global economy, capitalism puts a traditional banking system at the top of its agenda.Rather than addressing these flaws, we’re told ‘that’s capitalism’ and expected to accept that’s just the way it is.

Perhaps its biggest flaw is lack of transparency. Take, for example, the subprime mortgage crisis, largely caused by toxic pools of debt artificially created by banks and sold to funds around the world which subsequently (and unsurprisingly) defaulted. In plain terms, the financial system choked on its own creation.

While the current banking system is built on the premise of its reliability, blockchain is inherently trustworthy, putting into question its future relevancy.Some even claim blockchain could’ve prevented the 2008 financial crisis by giving regulators visibility of trading portfolios.

 A levelplaying field

If you’re a non-bank lender who would like to diversify your global lending potential, you will findit is punitively expensive, time-consuming and aimed almost exclusively at international banks and funds.

However, when the benefits of blockchain are applied to peer-to-peer finance, the playing field is levelled for both investors and borrowers. Suddenly, it opens international lending and debt to anyone, anywhere, finally allowing peer-to-peer to live up to its name.

Currently, it’s not possible to trade private debt on a P2P basis in any large volume.Instead, the global solution thus far has been to ‘bundle’ private debt into vast securitisation issues and we’ve seen the damage this can cause.

P2P platforms, lenders and borrowers have much to gain from this upgrade. There’s now an opportunity to diversify investment portfolios across global markets, for example,opening-up Asian debt for European lenders and vice versa, without high transaction fees, legal red tape or even a bank account.

It’s then surprising innovators in this space are being told it can’t be done, that cryptocurrencies and blockchain technologies area flash inthe pan and banks will continue to ‘own’ this space. Coincidently, it’s the same people who also said online lending was a ‘fad’ and lenders would never trust a small online business with their money.

The trust tipping point

The ICO recently found 80 percent of the UK public don’t trust organisations storing their personal information. Who can blame them when a day rarely goes by without a data breach hitting the headlines?

While blockchain is still in the early stages of transforming how we exchange value and whom we trust,it’s already gained the nickname “the unhackable smart contract”; a bold claim in today’s climate.

The World Economic Forum predicts by 2025 10 percent of global GDP will be stored on blockchains, yet governments and regulators around the work still fail to recognise cryptocurrencies as legitimate.

Only recently, the President of CryptoUK warned the UK Government the country is at risk of missing out on the global crypto economy if it fails to keep up and recognise the sector in the Financial Services Act.

Despite digital currencies experiencing some growing pains this year, the technology underlying blockchain is a bulletproof record keeping system, of whose data isn’t stored in one central location and is secured by a private key stored offline. All transactions are verified, cleared and stored in a block, creating a chain which cannot be altered.

This concept is nothing new; it’s the culmination of what Alan Turing started during WWII. Back then, just like today, the sceptics underestimated the power of cryptology to change the world.

The new and uncharted territories of blockchain enabling private debt trading and crypto-based lending are not risk averse but they both mark an important step forward in making the investment process more transparent, accessible, safer and ultimately, more rewarding.

There will be a trust tipping point soon where the capabilities of blockchain, not just for P2P lending but all industries, will be accepted. Perhaps it won’t be long after people start to question how we ever survived without it, jokingly exclaiming“remember capitalism?”

About Ablrate

Ablrate is a business lending platform, bringing lenders together with borrowers to provide asset-backed finance to a diverse range of businesses. Initially launched to service the aircraft leasing sector, loans now cover property, capital equipment and eco-projects.

Ablrate now has a 3,000 strong community that has loaned over £40 million to businesses and as traded over £20 million in its secondary market.

About David Bradley-Ward

David Bradley-Ward is the founder and entrepreneur behind the Ablrate.com platform and other financial and commercial businesses.

David is also Director of the European Association of Peer to Peer Lenders (EAPPL) and is FCA Approved.

Finance

Data Unions, fisherfolk and DeFi

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Data Unions, fisherfolk and DeFi 1

By Ruby Short, Streamr

In the fintech world it seems every month there’s a new trend or terminology to get acquainted with. From just learning about cryptocurrency a few years ago, to the crazy boom markets of 2017-18, the market has now moved on to DeFi, or Decentralised Finance to those less in the know.

It’s a trend which is gathering momentum, too – $275m of crypto collateral was invested in the DeFi economy in early 2019, but by February of this year it hit $1 billion, and by the end of July this number had risen to $4 billion.

According to crypto exchange Binance, DeFi refers to “a movement that aims to create an open-source, permissionless and transparent financial service ecosystem that is available to everyone and operates without any central authority.” Essentially it gives full asset control to those who use it, whether this is through peer-to-peer models or DeFi applications.

These apps, known as DApps, run on a blockchain network meaning they’re not controlled by a single authority. And as they are also Open Source, they are publicly available – characteristics that make transactions quicker, more affordable and more efficient than their centralised counterparts, where data is stored on servers managed by one authority (think traditional banks).

So why is DeFi getting so much attention?

DeFi is exciting for many because it gives more people more control over their money. Where much of the financial sector is traditionally centralised it inherits bias, thus restricting many people from their funds and what they can do with it.

With this approach, anyone can make investments or get into trading much more easily, and, most importantly, keep control in the hands of the user and not large corporations.

One of the preliminary benefits of this control is the improved visibility we gain over our financial data. In fact, any data we produce in general, whether online or through smart devices is predominantly controlled by giant centralised platforms such as Google and Facebook. In many cases users are unaware of where this is being sold on, or at least have been up until now.

As with DeFi and DApps, a way to decentralise this control has been introduced – in the form of Data Unions. A relatively new concept, this is a framework that enables individuals to bundle together their real-time data with others to create valuable insights which can be sold on, offering each the chance to earn revenue. It is helping businesses and individuals realise the value of the information they produce.

How does it work?

Our data on its own holds little value, but once bundled with multiple data sets from other people and sources and combined in a Data Union, it becomes an attractive set of insights to buyers who can use it to improve their market knowledge, product or service.

Data is shared through an app on the device or object via Streamr’s Data Union framework, a toolbox, which any developer or company can integrate into their existing products. It also allows individuals to choose which particular data types they share and monetise, and which they keep private.

This information then passes, encrypted, through the Streamr Network, to the Data Union where it’s bundled with others’ data for sale on the Marketplace – a process called crowdselling, which has the potential to generate unique data sets by incentivising trade directly from data producers.

What’s more, Data Unions can be set up to capture any form of data. For instance, a music streaming company could commission their own app where users could sell their listening and genre habits paired with their demographic info.

What has this got to do with DeFi?

Data Unions can help provide a means of DeFi direct to the people that need it most.

To break this down, a Data Union is beneficial because it enables any internet user to be paid for their data, which is unlike any data tax that has been proposed by many politicians. And, the advantage of a DeFi solution is that anyone can get paid from it because the finances are no longer dependent on their jurisdiction, but on which products they are using. Putting these together can have endless benefits.

We’re already seeing this happen, with a framework being used to improve the lives of financially marginalised groups. Tracey is a blockchain enabled Data Union working in partnership with WWF.

The application incentivises Filipino fisherfolk to record their catch and trade data digitally through direct data monetisation via the Streamr Marketplace. This data makes the first mile of their seafood products through the supply chain, traceable. With regional fish stocks declining, accurate catch yield data is a desirable insight for third party members such as retailers and final buyers.

The benefits of this model are twofold. Many fisherfolk in the Philippines are unbanked, meaning they don’t have a bank account. Trading this data gives them access to finance and loans previously out of reach, changing them and their family’s livelihoods. It also enables a self-sustaining ecosystem that captures accurate traceability data and helps these areas monitor their overfishing levels for more sustainable fishing.

What does this mean for us for the future?

We’re seeing a lot of momentum building around all forms of online decentralization,and the potential is huge. Over the coming years we will see these systems become ever more integrated into the existing internet stack, which will profoundly impact our possibilities online. Soon, it will become normal to take part in the internet’s data economy.

We see internet users becoming members of several Data Unions and have a range of different options to choose from that best suits them and their data sets. Personal data monetisation will no longer be a privacy issue we’re all suffering under, but rather a question of whether we want to sell our data or not. Users will have the freedom to choose for themselves if they want to sell their data or not and ethical data sharing will become the norm.

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ECOMMPAY expands Open Banking payments solution to Europe

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ECOMMPAY expands Open Banking payments solution to Europe 2

Open Banking by ECOMMPAY facilitates fast, secure and simple payments 

International payment service provider and direct bank card acquirer, ECOMMPAY, has today announced the expansion of its payment system Open Banking by ECOMMPAY to Europe. The solution allows consumers to initiate online payments to merchants.

Open Banking by ECOMMPAY leverages Open Banking technology, which enables third-party providers to access banks’ data to provide payment initiation through API connections. The news comes as research by the Open Banking Implementation Entity recently showed that uptake of Open Banking has doubled over the past six months, with more than two million consumers making use of the data-sharing service.

ECOMMPAY’s solution will allow consumers to connect to over 4000 banks in more than 28 European countries, while merchants can accept payments from customers in real-time, directly to their bank account. The solution is available in the UK, Latvia, Estonia and the Netherlands, and will be rolled out to further countries soon.

Benefits for consumers as well as merchants

For shoppers, Open Banking by ECOMMPAY means confidential information is accessed in a secure manner, compliant with GDPR requirements. Financial data is stored in one place so that credit decisions on loans or other transactions can be made promptly. Purchases can be made easily via smart devices, and consumers simply log in to their online banking via their mobile app to approve payments.

Merchants benefit from access to new infrastructure for payments. Without the need for credit or debit cards, chargeback risks due to fraud or an inability to capture funds are eliminated, while card fees are cut too. As the process does not require intermediaries, the payment process is efficient, and can also be customised by region, currency and other localised requirements. While banks usually have full control over the services customers need such as loans or transfers, Open Banking brings these decisions under a single administration.

Simplified European expansion

Historically, businesses growing into new markets would require a local banking relationship to facilitate the collection of direct debit payments, and face multiple complications around legal requirements, licenses and compliance. However, Open Banking by ECOMMPAY allows companies to use one efficient, cost-effective and simple payment solution to expand within Europe.

Paul Marcantonio, Executive Director of ECOMMPAY, commented: “Open Banking is revolutionising the way we pay, and the recent growth in its use indicates people are looking for more payments choice. Open Banking for Europe by ECOMMPAY will allow us to cater to the increasing number of people taking advantage of this secure, real-time and simple payment technology. Our solution will let merchants quickly expand into new markets and accept payments directly from customers’ bank accounts.

“With the pandemic shifting businesses online faster than ever before, the need for fast, safe and secure payment methods is growing. There is an urgent need to cater to a variety of payment methods, and at the same time to counter fraud and cyber-crime.”

ECOMMPAY has enjoyed steady growth since its launch in 2012, and has built a global presence with six international offices and operations in key markets including Asia, Europe, Africa, Russia and the UK. The company is a principal member of Visa and Mastercard, and a member of Visa Direct and MoneySend, as well as being the first payment provider on the PayPal Commerce Platform and the first acquirer to implement a Mastercard Dashboard.

The company will be hosting a webinar on Open Banking on 10th December. ECOMMPAY and its host speakers will look at the different opportunities that open banking brings for businesses, the challenges faced implementing it, and how to make it work from every business angle. Key topics will include how Open Banking will impact online business in the future, the effect of Brexit and Covid-19, and how to become an early adopter.

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The Hidden Costs of International E-commerce

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The Hidden Costs of International E-commerce 3

By Gavan Smythe, Managing Director, iCompareFX

Taking a business globally can be an attractive prospect, potentially targeting markets with fewer competitors, taking advantage of a larger consumer base and even gaining access to cost-effective manufacturing resources.

However, it’s not as simple as just shipping product overseas. Successful international traders conduct extensive market research, understanding each region’s barriers to entry – whether it’s regulations around communication and marketing, finding key contacts in supply chain management or navigating legal and cultural restrictions.

This also means identifying the hidden costs of international trading, which threaten the bottom line of businesses.

The price of peace of mind

Online trading isn’t without its complications. Buying online means handing over confidential bank or card details and, without the right protection in place, it can leave consumers open to theft and fraud.

That’s why e-commerce payment services include a gateway model, which secures transactions by encrypting the cardholder’s details and managing the payment process for the merchant.

However, like any specialist service, merchants pay to keep this sensitive data safe. Gateway fees are typically calculated as a percentage of the transaction amount. And while this payment model is useful for SMEs – helping them efficiently scale – it represents an additional cost that many business owners don’t account for.

Those tempted to simply roll out the cheapest service risk damaging their reputation by potentially being an unsafe seller and one which undervalues its customers. This will eventually impact revenue, as customers look elsewhere, and merchants navigate the costly time spent ironing out problems with insecure payments.

When it comes to choosing a payment gateway service, key considerations should include working with a provider which operates across the same regions and checking contract terms. Some providers may charge set-up fees, monthly subscription fees or implement a blanket charge if a minimum volume of transactions isn’t met.

Merchants should also consider whether to use a direct or indirect payment gateway. While direct payment gateways allow consistent branding with customised design and copy, it may cost extra to integrate the service with an existing website.

Indirect gateways take users away to a separate payment portal on a different page. This is cost-effective to install and can appear more secure to users as they may be using a familiar and trusted payment gateway brand

Calculating conversion fees

As a business owner, payment gateway solution providers charge a number of percentage fees. While for sellers in domestic markets the fee structure can be quite simple, for online sellers in overseas markets, the fee structure becomes complex.

For example, as an international online seller, you can be subject to additional costs for processing international cards, plus additional currency conversion costs back to your business’ home currency.

In some circumstances, this can cost up to 9 percent of your sale revenue. A business has the choice of passing these costs on to the customer or to reduce its profit margin in international markets.

Businesses shouldn’t rush when it comes to choosing a provider. Taking the time to review and compare what’s out there puts them in a stronger position to choose the perfect match.

Providers vary in their offerings, from the regions they operate in, to their fees and exchange rates and even transfer speeds. Those who value trust and transparency may be willing to pay slightly higher to work with a provider which offers exceptional customer service standards, helping them navigate the currency exchange process.

For those moving into multiple markets, it’s worth using a comparison service or tool to make sure they’re partnering with the right provider for each currency pair and region, as it’s unlikely a single provider will offer a blanket ‘best solution’ across the global market.

The role of multi-currency accounts

Having looked at the impact of currency conversion fees, what can businesses do to mitigate these costly charges when it comes to trading in an increasing number of currencies?

Opening a multi-currency account allows businesses to access the speed and affordable conversion costs needed to make the most of international trading. They allow businesses to access unique local banking details in foreign countries and all balances and transfer controls are accessible within a single dashboard.

Not only are the conversion fees associated with these accounts much lower compared with transferring currencies between bank accounts but it’s also quick and efficient – allowing businesses to access funds almost instantly and pass this convenience on to customers.

Specialist money transfer companies that offer multi-currency account solutions offer these services at no monthly cost. Simple and low-cost fee structures are applied on currency conversion and outgoing funds. And incoming receipts of money transfers don’t cost a penny.

Not all multi-currency account solution providers offer access to the same currencies. Furthermore, not all payment gateways offer support for payouts in multiple currencies. Businesses should conduct an assessment of current and future customer and supplier locations to choose the most appropriate solution provider.

Conducting an internal risk assessment helps businesses decide which multi-currency account makes sense for them, based on key requirements, like the number of supported currencies, target regions, potential overdraft facilities and ease of transfers.

Managing international suppliers

In many industries, international e-commerce is not as simple as just sending products to different regions. Logistics and legal regulations across the world mean businesses are often required to work with local specialists to deliver their service or offering.

This may mean working with local manufacturers to produce products in each region or simply partnering with local marketing, PR or advertising professionals to create culturally sensitive brand awareness in the native language.

In these cases, the business becomes the customer. They are required to make payments in multiple currencies as they manage their global operations.

For example, UK bank accounts charge relatively large fees to make payments in foreign currencies and these soon add up when running operations around the world.

This is where multi-currency accounts again prove fruitful. Not only do they allow businesses to hold multiple currencies – which is ideal for sellers – but they can also send money to other accounts with minimal fees if they’re in the same currency.

Paying suppliers in the same region as their customer base can remove the double currency conversion by receiving payment gateway payouts in the foreign currency and paying out of the multi-currency account in the same currency. No currency conversion is necessary in this scenario.

Businesses able to identify all these costs and admin fees up-front will be best placed to get the most value from the research and comparison stage when comparing providers.

Ultimately, they’ll achieve the lowest possible fees for each market, currency and transaction.

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