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Industry Leaders Define HowFinTech is Accelerating Positive Transformation of Banking in Africa

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Industry Leaders Define HowFinTech is Accelerating Positive Transformation of Banking in Africa

The FinTech space in Africa is witnessing rapid growth as innovative new financial services players disrupt the traditional modalities of banking across the continent.

Finnovation Africa: Kenya 2018, which will be held on the 31stof May 2018 at the Radisson Blu Nairobi, will gather international FinTech experts together with African pioneers, investors, government policymakers, entrepreneurs and leading bankers to harness the FinTech revolution to boost strategic economic priorities such as financial inclusion – and how FinTech can make a positive and profitable difference in Africa. The event will also explore how the major banks and financial institutions on the continent are addressing the digital transformation of financial services and how their own digital innovations are being shaped and accelerated as a result of the gathering momentum of FinTech disruptors.

 

Paul Muthaura

Paul Muthaura

The unique environment for financial services in Africa is fertile ground for innovative FinTech players who are capitalising on the opportunities to disrupt or leapfrog established business models to make financial services more affordable, accessible and profitable across the continent.FinnovationKenya 2018 is delighted to welcome a stellar list of keynote speakers, including Paul Muthaura, CEO of Capital Markets Authority Kenya;Dave Van Niekerk,Founder and Executive Chairman of MyBucks;Aaron Fu, Managing Partner, MEST; Jeremy Awori, Managing Director of Barclays Bank Kenya Ltd; and Declan Magero, Founding Partner, Afrinet Capital. The opening keynote session will define directions on Aligning the Role of Government Policymakers, Banks, FinTech Innovators, Investors, Multilateral Agencies, MNOs and the Private Sector to Advance the FinTech Ecosystem in Africa.

Paul Muthaura, CEO of Capital Markets Authority Kenya Ltd, speaking ahead of his participation in the event, said that: “Kenya has rapidly become an internationally recognized pace-setter for FinTech innovation as global players increasingly look to learn lessons especially in areas where the country has built world-class capabilities such as in mobile money. We have built a supporting infrastructure and are strengthening our regulatory framework to foster FinTech innovation and drive capital market activity to the next level. The Authority is at an advanced stage of implementing a Regulatory Sandbox to provide a safe space for innovative ideas to transition into the regulated environment. Across emerging markets, and particularly in Africa where there is an absence of the legacy infrastructure found in most developed economies, Fintech presents a transformational opportunity to leapfrog traditional costs and time delays in rolling out world class financial services infrastructure, products, services and distributions channels. The pioneers and experts gathering at Finnovation Kenya 2018 will provide critical insights on this exciting journey.”

Jeremy Awori

Jeremy Awori

Finnovation Kenya 2018 will also provide a platform to connect innovative start-ups with leading investors in the African FinTech space and the Wolves’ Den session is one of the most dynamic features of the event.The Wolves’ Den enables innovative FinTech start-ups and trail-blazers to real-time test the positive impact of their solutions. A panel representing savvy Investors/Venture Capitalists and seasoned African Fintech Pioneers will evaluate the business model of each chosen start‐up or trail‐blazer in a high-stress 10-minute “elevator pitch” to the “Wolves” who will ask the tough questions and provide the illuminating insights.

Dave Van Niekerk

Dave Van Niekerk

Speaking ahead of his participation in Finnovation Kenya 2018, Dave Van Niekerk, CEO of MyBucks, said that: “The global microfinance, retail banking and credit landscape has long required a revolution and this rapid and dramatic change, with financial inclusion at its heart, is already well underway. FinTech innovations are enabling the distribution of financial products at competitive pricing, providing the basis to rapidly scale-up as well as effectively manage credit risk. Incumbent financial institutions will eventually be forced to embrace this technology to acquire clients, determine risk and retain clients, effectively closing the divide between FinTech and traditional finance organizations. The Finnovation Kenya 2018 event will create a powerful platform for start-ups and trail-blazers, to understand the broader ecosystem as well as for incumbent Financial powerhouses from across Africa to engage and learn from each other.”

Further emphasizing the importance of the development of the FinTech ecosystem to economies across Africa, Sunny Walia, General Manager for Visa East Africa, said that: “With just 17% of people in Africa having access to formal financial services, almost a third of funding raised by African startups in 2017was in the Fintech sector. Venture funding for African startups jumped by 51% to $195 million in 2017.And so, with over a hundred million dollars invested over the past ten years alone, the region’s Fintech industry is on the brink of a transformative breakthrough. At Visa, we believe the time is ripe to bring together its brightest minds and work on the next big idea in payments technology. With a clear goal of enabling cashless economies and financial inclusion, Visa is committed to fostering an entrepreneurial spirit and driving innovation in its payments landscape.”

Mr. Walia continued by saying, “To this end, we at Visa announced that its Visa’s Everywhere Initiative, a global innovation program that tasks start-ups to solve commerce challenges of tomorrow and further enhance their own product propositions and provide visionary solutions for Visa’s vast network of partners, will expand into the Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) region. Entrants in the first-ever Sub-Sahara Visa’s Everywhere Initiative (VEI)will have the opportunity to compete for a chance to win up to USD 50,000, access to Visa’s products and services, expert mentorship and support from Visa and exposure to key Visa partners and clients.
To date, the program has had nearly 2,100 participating start-ups across North America, Latin America, Europe, Asia Pacific, Africa and the Middle East. Today, I am keen to participate in Finnovation Kenya 2018 to help shape the dialogue around the next steps on how banks and fintech players can collaborate with Visa to transform economies across the continent”

Sunny walia

Sunny walia

From the perspective of a leading banker, Jeremy Awori, Managing Director of Barclays Bank of Kenya Ltd, reinforced that “the rapid growth of FinTech on the continent is driving both the disruption and leapfrogging of legacy systems and is further accelerating the digital transformation of financial services across Africa.

As a bank, our innovation and digitization agenda is in top gear and is aimed at moving the bulk of transactions to channels such as mobile banking, Internet banking and agency banking in order to increase customer convenience. We have recently launched our pioneer virtual banking proposition, Timiza, which offers our customers a platform to conduct their financial transactions ranging from borrowing, saving, bill payments and funds transfer etc from the comfort of their mobile phones.

I look forward to participating in Finnovation Kenya 2018 and engaging with FinTech pioneers from across the continent to address how FinTech is contributing to the positive transformation of financial services in Africa.”

Finnovation Africa: Kenya 2018 will take place at the Radisson Blu in Nairobi, Kenya on the 31stof May 2018 and will gather all stakeholders and influencers in the African FinTech ecosystem, from innovative start-ups to banking powerhouses, representing the key markets across Africa and internationally.

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Wireless Connectivity Lights the Path to Bank Branch Innovation

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Wireless Connectivity Lights the Path to Bank Branch Innovation 1

By Graham Brooks, Strategic Account Director, Cradlepoint EMEA

As consumers cautiously return to the UK high street in the past few weeks, banks can expect customer footfall in branch to rise accordingly. But whether it’s checking in for a mortgage appointment or cashing in a cheque, awareness of the ongoing potential health risks must be top of mind.

At the same time, the pandemic has forced a transition to the future bank branch. This means that there will be less people and more machines – digital signs, contactless devices, and new cash deposit systems.

To ensure they continue to provide a service that attracts new customers, banks must digitise their branches. And wireless technology is going to form the underlying infrastructure that makes that possible.

Wireless WAN providing reliability

Traditional banks now face their biggest challenge in history: digital-only banking. Over two-thirds of participants in a 2020 study planned to transition to a digital-only bank in the future. It’s therefore vital that traditional banks running physical branches update in-branch customer experience to compete with the new pack on the prairie. Reliability plays a big part. So does trust.

The future of in-branch experience lies in technologies such as IoT, VR/AR, and AI, all of which are highly data-intensive. Reliable connectivity is therefore critical, and banks should be shooting for zero-downtime connectivity, allowing no room for gaps in service.

To do this, banks can deploy Gigabit-class 4G LTE (LTE Advanced) or 5G adapters that bridge to a traditional ethernet connection, providing a wireless option to the wired-line router. Then, in the rare scenario where wireless connectivity is down, at least one of the WAN connections is always guaranteed to be live. The router has the autonomy to determine when failover is necessary.

Better still, the reliability of modern Gigabit 4G LTE and 5G connectivity now means that failover is often unnecessary. A branch can, therefore, run its network independent of a wired-line connection and benefit from the security and agility of a resilient wireless network, while still providing enterprise-grade connectivity.

Branch network reliability, in this way, will support the bank’s reliability as a whole. In turn, this will fuel the higher standards of customer experience needed to compete with more agile digital-only banks.

The new reality of IoT

The first organised response to stop the spread of the virus around the world was social distancing. While transparent screens can be used to block transmission, the overarching effect of these measures has been a loss of communication capabilities. This will affect banks like it has everywhere else, if not more as a space where interaction is so important.

IoT technology will be core to overcoming these barriers. Digital signage, kiosks, and surveillance cameras will all contribute to improved communication and security, and a better customer banking experience. But to enable such extensive use of IoT devices operating on a single network, banks must ensure they can accommodate such high levels of data transfer. Using Gigabit 4G LTE connectivity to extend its services beyond traditional network infrastructure, banks will achieve the required levels of bandwidth.

Hybrid connections managed in the cloud

With high volumes of data being transferred across the network, security and availability should be at the top of the agenda when digitising bank branches. But these are not always easy to implement, especially in an environment with several complex networks of endpoints.

Graham Brooks

Graham Brooks

For example, marketing teams need to push personalised content to customers on digital signs and IT teams need to set visitors up on a guest WiFi network. These operations require the guarantee of security and availability, with trust and the customer experience at the core.

Wireless networks excel in this aspect as they can employ the benefits of a cloud-based management system. Cloud-based systems make it easier for bank staff working from home, who can access the same assets and applications from their sofa as they would otherwise have in-branch. The service is the same.

Cloud management systems also provide improved network visibility, giving IT teams endpoint information from across the network as it happens. With security patches being updated on devices simultaneously, leaving reduced time for opportunistic attacks to exploit known vulnerabilities.

Equally, by using a hybrid Gigabit 4G LTE network in tandem with a wired connection, businesses can achieve simplicity from an otherwise complex challenge. The primary wired network can be used to transmit any sensitive information securely, while a separate network using the Gigabit 4G LTE connection runs other in-branch operations.

The branch’s network, in this way, is ‘air-gapped’. The secure data being processed by the operations team runs on an essentially separate network to that of the marketing team’s content. The network will also increase its ability to process more information, with its workload spread out.

The simplest solutions are often the best. In this case, exploiting a hybrid network can address the complexities of security and availability when employing enterprise-grade connectivity.

Invest now for future 5G rewards

As banks continue to adapt their branches over the course of the pandemic, they should invest in business-wide digitisation to secure a sustainable pathway to the future. To achieve this, banks must ensure their network solution enables carrier-class connectivity. It should make use of the full spectrum of connectivity – 4G LTE to 5G – and offer the full spectrum of 5G bandwidth. Branches aren’t going anywhere soon. They must ensure that their services are optimal now, and in ten years’ time.

Fortune favours the bold, and those who chose to adopt revolutionary and innovative technology early are already on their journey. Learning from this, banks that invest now to improve their future infrastructure will thrive once 5G does arrive. Good things do not come to those who ‘wait’. They come to those who prepare well in advance.

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Financial Regulations: How do they impact your cloud strategy?

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Financial Regulations: How do they impact your cloud strategy? 2

By Michael Chalmers, MD EMEA at Contino

How exactly do financial regulations affect your cloud strategy? It’s a question many of our customers have been scratching their heads about. Some solutions are costly and over-complex – but by asking the right questions, the wrong solutions can be avoided.

Following the Financial Conduct Authority’s (FCA) 2020 review, it’s clear that highly regulated enterprises must work harder than ever to stay within various limits which protect customers during an economically strenuous pandemic. Below, I address three questions we’re hearing from customers about how to optimise the cloud whilst sticking to FCA regulations.

  1. What regulations must you consider before outsourcing to a cloud provider?

If you have an application or workload that you’re looking to put into the cloud, you will have various service levels that you’ve defined for that particular stack. When you’re looking at the cloud provider and asking yourself what services to use, you’ll need to consider how that aligns to your service levels. How do I architect it to make sure that it’s aligned and that it can tolerate failure?

At the very start of that journey, before you even start putting your workloads into the cloud, you need to set the standards that you will need to adhere to. The Shared Responsibility Model is a key asset in understanding where your responsibility lies.

There are a number of things that you need to make sure are in your contract with the cloud provider. Unless you specifically sign a contract addendum with them, you can’t guarantee that useful and knowledgeable assistance is included.

While the guidelines are very clear on a number of clauses that you need to put in your contract with the cloud provider, these regulations apply to outsourcing in general. Cloud providers are very mature, so they will come with pre-packed addendums to the standard contract they offer that are customised to comply with FCA regulations. However, if you start outsourcing IT functions in a different way, e.g. if you start using a Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) provider which is delivered using the cloud, the new provider will need to be vetted to make sure that you have the right clauses in your contract with them. While cloud providers are very mature on this, most SaaS tools are not.

  1. How can you control or restrict where data in the cloud moves?

When it comes to data security, there are various options available on Amazon Web Services (AWS). For example, you can securely lock particular regions into an account on AWS. It’s also worth looking at your account structure policy. If you have accounts where data can’t reside outside the EU, you can put the workloads into that bundle and you can lock it down at policy level. There is an element of trust with the provider here as well.

While AWS offers prescribed controls to block certain regions, other cloud providers have different strategies. In the case of Google Cloud (GCP), you can specify service controls so that, even for managed services such as Big Query, you can lock your data in not just one region, but within your virtual private cloud. In other words, not only can you block specific regions or allow specific regions, you can specify that only things within a region can assess data within a region as a general policy.

  1. What does the regulator need to see to approve your exit strategy?

In terms of documentation, it’s not a case of “show me your policies and test plan” but rather “show me how you exercise it”.

Most of the time it’s a months-long process and it comes down to personal relationships: you build trust over time with the regulator as you build your exit plan. You should be able to discuss what else they would like to see in there.  While there used to be a template for an exit plan in the European Banking Authority (EBA) regulations in a previous version, this has since been removed.

Regulators don’t tend to look at test reports. However, they do post a lot of information on audit reports and auditors. These auditors are there to check you’re doing what you say you’re doing. At the end of the day you are responsible for demonstrating your exit plan – it has to be coherent, consistent and compelling.

Final Thoughts

The truth is, most of the time, regulators are just trying to encourage you to do what works. That being said, sometimes their outlook doesn’t quite match with your view, or sometimes there’s an artificial difference that can be smoothed over or finessed. Occasionally you have to remember that we had 2008. What if in 2020 we have a massive AWS outage?

Multi-cloud is a natural strategy. There’s a number of high-level, cloud-native services that can be leveraged to simplify the implementation of multi-cloud in large financial institutions. Adhering to the multitude of guidelines can be complex and time-consuming, but forging the right path through the regulations will ensure that your multi-cloud is optimised to provide the most streamlined and efficient service possible to your business.

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Post-COVID Mortgage Processing: Ripe for Intelligent Automation to Boost Organisational Resiliency

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Post-COVID Mortgage Processing: Ripe for Intelligent Automation to Boost Organisational Resiliency 3

By Asheesh Mehra, Group CEO and Co-founder, AntWorks

As seen in many other countries, the COVID-19 pandemic sent a shockwave through the UK housing market, bringing the entire sector to a virtual standstill. As lockdown restrictions  ease, we are now witnessing a housing boom like no other, as thousands have entered the market looking to capitalise on the UK government’s new stamp duty relief on properties priced up to £500,000. At the same time, however, the economic fallout from this financial crisis has resulted in almost 750,000 people losing their jobs and countless more being furloughed, leading to an increase in property remortgaging requests and payment holidays.

As a result, banks and mortgage companies now find themselves inundated with new mortgage applications, refinancing and forbearance applications. To support this, there is now a drastic need for increased manpower to manually process the plethora of mortgage enquiries in a more efficient manner. That being said, the uncertainty of future pandemic impact and restrictions being imposed at a local or global level is leaving the industry under severe pressure to deal with the demand as quickly and effectively as possible.

Like many other industries feeling the impact of the COVID-19 crisis, the mortgage sector needs to deploy digitisation in their operations in order to scale their business faster than before or risk being left behind. Artificial Intelligence, deployed in conjunction with intelligent automation, can help ease the burden on mortgage brokers and lenders by accelerating the mortgage loan process and reducing costly errors caused by manual input.

Achieving speed and scale through intelligent automation

Automation is a viable and logical  solution for mortgage lenders as approximately 60 – 70 per cent of tasks in mortgage processes across the value chain are, replicable and prep-based tasks that are suitable candidates for automation. Traditionally, mortgage companies frequently conduct borrowing assessments that require careful analysis and comparison of customer data. This includes checking and establishing customer credit history as well as affordability by manually processing data from income documentation such as bank statements and payslips. This is a tedious but highly necessary process known (rather un-fondly) in the industry as the “stare and compare” stage of mortgage processing

These tasks require a huge amount of paperwork and form filling, which is not only time-consuming but also prone to human error. Furthermore, in their day-to-day routine, mortgage processors are required to literally unpackage and organise documents that are often in paper formats. This is a laborious process especially when executed across multiple mortgage applications at the same time.

This is where intelligent automation steps in to help mortgage companies take on and complete far more work, at a much faster rate and with higher accuracy. Automation can relieve mortgage workers from repetitive tasks such as manually populating the loan origination systems. This means that customers can get loans approved quickly and efficiently. In fact, a global mortgage provider leveraged the power of automation to increase the speed at which mortgage documents were being generated by up to 90 per cent without compromising the integrity of its review process. What’s more, they also managed to improve the turnaround time for the more complex documents by 100 per cent.

Cognitive Machine Reading (CMR) based solutions are the answer for companies looking to achieve straight-through processing for all their mortgage documents. CMR enables mortgage companies to overcome the challenges of digitising unstructured data and achieve faster ROI with higher accuracy with data certainty. Additionally, it can help mortgage companies to cut down on loan processing costs by up to two-thirds and mortgage origination time by 50 per cent.

The (fractal) science behind CMR is that it uses integrated AI capabilities to process highly complex unstructured data along with the more basic data formats. This data can then easily flow through the entire organisation via an end-to-end process achieved with little to no human interference.

Inevitably, all business data needs to be digitised so that it can feed analytics, drive automation, and provide those much-needed customer insights. CMR can play a part to eliminate repetitive and error-prone stare-and-compare tasks that are often a commonplace in mortgage processing. It is able to identify and process the context of data and validate it against existing information elsewhere. As a result, this speeds up the overall processing time for new mortgage and refinancing requests.

Avoiding common automation mistakes

Before kickstarting any digital transformation journey or automation projects, it is imperative that businesses look into avoiding the pitfalls of adopting the wrong automation tools. For example, utilising traditional Optical Character Recognition (OCR) technology for business processes can lead to significant data challenges which will slow down and impede automation goals. OCR is a simple data ingestion tool that is limited to only processing and automating structured data that comes in the form of fixed-field text. Given that 80 per cent of the data within most organisations is unstructured or does not have a predefined format (e.g. emails, images, signatures, social media feeds), OCR technology cannot ingest the vast majority of data trapped inside a mortgage process (or any other business process). In order to overcome this and improve its business process outcomes, one leading Insurance provider managed to process large volumes of unstructured data via CMR automation to achieve 75 per cent reduction in the manual data extraction of handwritten documents. Additionally, the company also achieved more than 92 per cent accuracy in identifying and processing handwritten content.

Critical, everyday business data contained in multiple formats such as emails, images, and handwritten material make up a large part of unstructured data. This is why businesses need to put greater emphasis on researching and identifying intelligent automation solutions that can unlock this date to achieve their business goals. CMR enables mortgage companies to significantly accelerate the course of identifying and classifying all types of documents by cutting down the reduction time for processing mortgage claims by 90 per cent with a substantial level of accuracy (75%). What’s more, it enables any organisation to automate at scale, bringing true automation as a company-wide approach rather than a segregated one.

The COVID-19 pandemic has managed to speed up the need for businesses to embrace digital transformation. This may well be the catalyst for many mortgage organisations steeped in antiquated legacy-based ways of working to refine and streamline their business operations via straight-through processing. It is clear that companies can successfully automate entire business operations to not only improve their operational efficiency but also achieve organisational resilience in a long run. And the faster mortgage lenders can tackle their processes right now, the better for the sooner they can pass those efficiencies and savings onto customers to help rebuild the economy and bolster the housing market in the UK and elsewhere.

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