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Taishin Financial Holding Conferred Asia’s Most Prominent CSR Awards under Investment in People Category

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TAIPEI, TAIWAN – Media_OutReach – 10 June 2019 – A total of 64 projects and business leaders across 16 countries in Asia were selected as recipients of Asia Responsible Enterprise Awards (AREA) 2019, an increase of 19% from last year. Regarded as the top corporate social responsibility awards in Asia, this year’s ceremony was organized in Taipei, after being held in Macau, Singapore, Bangkok, and Manila previously.
Organized by Enterprise Asia, the leading non-governmental organization for responsible entrepreneurship in Asia, the AREA aims to recognize and honor Asian businesses and leaders for championing sustainable and socially responsible business practices. The award categories are social empowerment, investment in people, health promotion, green leadership, corporate governance, and responsible business leadership. Some of the dignitaries who graced the event include Mr. Chang San-cheng, former premier of the Republic of China (Taiwan) and Mr. Hou Yu-Ih, mayor of New Taipei City.
Leading the list of winners under the investment in people category was Taishin Financial Holding Co., Ltd. with their project “Dual Mentoring Program”.
Founded in 2002, Taishin owns 12 subsidiaries running bank, securities, investment trust, investment advisory and other businesses. With their branding position as “Your Smart Partner”, the Company holds the believes of “Integrity, Commitment, Innovation and Collaboration” to fulfil customers’ need and to be a leader in Taiwan’s financial industry.
The Company is dedicated to building an environment which they can develop with their employees. They invested abundant resources to hold regular engagement surveys, capture how their employees think about the Company, identify key factors that retain their employees, and set action plans towards important issues.
From 2018, Taishin cooperated with internationally renowned consulting firm to introduce the Pulse Survey System, which allows them to create diverse surveys and research on different demographic groups, instantly hearing their voice and shortening their response time to launch action plans. To collect the real opinions, the Company launched focus-group interviews or face-to-face interviews at all branches irregularly. They constantly hear and seek improvement, based on the different touch points of employees’ career stages, integrating their experience and KPI, proving that employees are their most important asset.
Based on the organization’s development and the professional needs of different fields, Taishin follows a pyramid structure to develop talents and expand the pool of key talents and mid-high level managerial talents. For employees of different functions, the Company differentiate their management methods. For example, for the newly-hired financial advisors, they encourage them to pair as mentor and apprentice by themselves. The teaching and learning interaction between them boosts their growth, which in turn, enhance their competitiveness. Meanwhile, Taishin has a less limited rotation system which allows employees to develop horizontally. The Company actively builds career paths for each of their employees, creating profound and productive influences.
The “Dual Mentoring Program”, proved effective as it resulted in higher performances, engagement and promotion speed, as well as a lower turnover rate.
For the mid-term goal, the mentor and apprentice team interaction created a win-win culture, maintaining a constant growth of performance. Besides, the mentors learn managerial skills, ensuring the Company’s long-term talent development. For the long-term objective, the systematic structure of the program not only creates a positive cycle but also enhances engagement.
In the future, Taishin plans to apply this successful model to new-hires and junior employees in other functions and departments. Meanwhile, the Company actively strengthens the relationship with campuses and younger communities. Through industry-university cooperation, substitute military service and R&D substitute service (a form of Taiwanese alternative civilian service), and “Dual Mentoring Program”, Taishin encourages students, their potential employees, to gain successful working experience in advance. They not only help them become more employable upon graduation but also makes them more experienced, familiarize themselves with the Company’s culture, and equip professional skills before the official employment, the know-how helps them grow faster after on boarding. *** About Enterprise Asia *** Enterprise Asia is a non-governmental organization in pursuit of creating an Asia that is rich in entrepreneurship as an engine towards sustainable and progressive economic and social development within a world of economic equality. Its two pillars of existence are investment in people and responsible entrepreneurship. Enterprise Asia works with governments, NGOs and other organizations to promote competitiveness and entrepreneurial development, in uplifting the economic status of people across Asia and in ensuring a legacy of hope, innovation and courage for the future generation. For more information, visit: https://www.enterpriseasia.org/. *** About Asia Responsible Enterprise Awards *** The Asia Responsible Enterprise Awards recognizes and honors Asian businesses for championing sustainable and responsible entrepreneurship in the categories of Green Leadership, Investment in People, Health Promotion, Social Empowerment, Corporate Governance and Responsible Business Leadership. For more information, visit: https://enterpriseasia.org/area/.

Business

Business recovery from COVID-19 lies in implementing the practice of Open Book Management

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Business recovery from COVID-19 lies in implementing the practice of Open Book Management 1

By Suranga Herath is CEO of English Tea Shop, the leading independent speciality and organic tea company.

Over the course of the last few months, most businesses have been forced to adapt their strategy against the backdrop of the pandemic. For many companies, business growth and development slowed and certain key goals and innovations fell to the wayside in order to prioritise ‘survival’.

For my business – a speciality tea company – we place great emphasis on exporting across the globe and bringing people together to enjoy a cup of tea as part of a wider community. Neither of those things have been possible amidst the pandemic. Whilst this was initially difficult for us, we are now steadily transforming our business to function in the new world order and our business model of Creating Shared Value is instrumental in making this happen. This has not only brought us closer with our suppliers and customers during this challenging time, but also through the practice of Open Book Management (OBM) we have been able to navigate this time united and focussed. OBM fosters a unique culture of employee and stakeholder transparency, empowerment, and satisfaction; in turn leading to incredible results, loyalty and increased productivity across the board.

So as we start adjusting to the new normal, I wanted to share a couple of reflections that I believe has made a fundamental difference during this challenging time. My firm belief is that whilst the road to recovery will be a long process for any business, it is through implementing initiatives like the Open Book Management that businesses from all sectors can put their best foot forward as we enter the new normal.

Open Book Management – a definition

Open-book management (OBM) is the business practice of creating transparency through sharing financial information with employees across the company. The power of its implementation lies beyond just the practical means, as the philosophy and theory carry profound ripple effect across the entire organisation and culture. Whilst for many leaders the idea of sharing financial information with employees beyond the senior management team seems alien, the benefits reaped are worth the effort.

Open Book Management (OBM) is a system that incorporates this financial transparency alongside providing teaching, KPIs and bonus systems for employees, as well as Employee Share Ownership Program (ESOP) which gives staff a percentage of the company shares. The idea behind this is that when employees gain a better understanding of how the organisation is run, they become empowered by this knowledge and become more committed to the company and its results.

This is not necessarily limited to employees, and is often extended to stakeholders; in fact, at English Tea Shop we have been equally transparent with our community of organic farmers, reaching out to them during Covid to be transparent around our cash flow and assure them in their role as suppliers.

Road to Recovery

Regardless of industry, size or previous growth, any business leader will admit that the recovery from prolonged socio and economic disruption like the COVID-19 pandemic is a long and challenging process. Businesses that choose to shake up their traditional business models and embrace a more disruptive and progressive approach will experience a first mover advantage and put themselves in a good position for the long and hard battle ahead. In my view, initiatives like OBM and the Great Game of Business are the perfect starting point for any business that is looking to motivate its workforce through fostering a strong community and igniting entrepreneurial spirit.

Our Story

Since inception, my goal for English Tea Shop has always been to build a business of dedicated people with sustainability as our guiding force. Our model of Creating Shared Value is focused on creating win-win situations whilst finding opportunities for growth in sustainable development. All whilst looking after our Prajava (Sri Lankan word for community).

Over the last couple of years we’ve grown substantially, whilst keeping a happy and motivated workforce. This has resulted in numerous awards wins. But perhaps the biggest measurable achievement to date is the 31% improvement of productivity across our factories in just under 12 months. This came about organically without any further investment towards new technology or systems during that period.

From a business perspective, this meant we had increased capacity to do more, and reach a wider audience. It also helped us win a host of prestigious awards for Sustainability, such as the Queen’s Award, National Business Award, Gold awards at Sri Lanka’s National Productivity Awards and many others. Just this month, we were awarded the “The Great Game of Business All-Star” for our commitment to generating results through integrating Open Book Management within the Creating Shared Value business model.

Even during the most difficult years, such as Brexit, we were able to keep our head high and remain profitable despite the numerous external challenges, and this was because everyone worked towards a commonly shared goal and had a high level of accountability in terms of their individual actions; no matter how little they believe them to affect the bigger picture. This is the magic of OBM.

While for my business and many alike financials have been strong, the most profound impact of OBM lies on the level of understanding it fosters greater understanding of business. When everyone started thinking and acting like commercially-minded business people they understood challenges better, and they applied their knowledge and skills much better. Hence, we are confident of a long-term approach that will make us a uniquely sustainable business.

Why now?

From my perspective, there is nothing more powerful than a business driven by entrepreneurially minded employees, that understand how their role plays a part in the bigger picture and strategy of the business. This is exactly the type of mindset and culture that OBM fosters, and embedded across the entire organisation, and if our results are anything to go by the potential is endless.

I urge other businesses to take stock of their current operations and means of growth, and look beyond the traditional strategies as it is through progressive approaches like OBM that the combination of business growth and employee satisfaction can be achieved.

And with more uncertainty heading our way, now is the time to start.

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Technology

Making Connectivity A Key Part of Cloud Strategy for Finance

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Making Connectivity A Key Part of Cloud Strategy for Finance 2

By Eric Troyer, CMO at Megaport

Finance organisations across the board are facing unprecedented disruption, with new technology entering the industry and consumer demands constantly evolving. Firms are trying to adapt to the rise of digital-first and the insatiable hunger of customers for increased speed and new types of services.

Leaders in the finance industry see cloud adoption as vital for multiple reasons. For example, they can leverage the cloud to speed up processing, eliminate data silos, surface deeper insights, and lower infrastructure and operating costs. As Peter Williams, global head of financial services technology, at Amazon Web Services, argues: “Taking advantage of virtually unlimited data storage and compute power to mine their core data allows financial institutions to make better trading, investment, and policy underwriting decisions. Analysing patterns across exabytes of data used to require significant investment and time, but cloud services that automate machine learning (ML) algorithms are improving how quickly organisations can innovate for their customers.”

Many financial organisations have long realised the importance of the cloud, however adoption has picked up steam in the last 12 months, and this only looks to be accelerating. Eighty-four per cent of fintechs, 82 per cent of corporate banks, 74 per cent of retail banks and 79 per cent of intermediaries globally plan to move mission-critical workloads into public cloud infrastructure by the end of this year, according to Ovum and ACI Worldwide.

It isn’t necessarily surprising that the finance industry is now fully embracing the cloud and understanding the innovative benefits it provides, but are they taking a step back to make sure the infrastructure is in place to support these goals? Are they thinking about how to actually make the cloud work for them?

Connecting the tightly-knit financial services ecosystems

The global professional services firm EY argues, “The benefits of cloud technology can’t be contested. It’s less expensive, easier to use, and in many ways, safer than private data centres. In addition to its benefits, cloud technology helps solve some of the most pressing concerns of financial institutions.” It goes without saying that the cloud is going to play a vital role in how the finance sector develops for years to come. However, that comes with pressure to get it right now.

For example, a stockbroker may use data to influence their decisions to purchase or sell, but they need to have access to this information quickly, then marry it with intelligence on their customer (their appetite for risk, etc.), and then be able to seamlessly make the purchase or sale. Having access to the data and partners that solves just one part of this equation isn’t helpful; it all has to be linked up.

This all requires speed, but, more importantly, it relies on a tightknit ecosystem for its success. Therefore, high performing cloud connectivity must be at the heart of any cloud strategy for finance organisations, so that they can tie these ecosystems together and move data quickly and securely. Despite this being a critical ingredient to success, many businesses have focused on what cloud service provider they will use or what application they want to run without considering how they will actually connect it all together.

While many CTOs focus on their cloud strategy, what really needs to be refined is their connectivity strategy.

Cloud connectivity — elastic is fantastic

When it comes to networks and connectivity, many finance organisations would have traditionally utilised a Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) network. However, when private MPLS networks were first deployed, accessing cloud providers may not have been top of mind. Today, this is a critical factor in the deployment.

To support the enterprise costs of deploying a large-scale MPLS network, an organisation most likely entered into a long-term contract, not necessarily planning for how cloud could affect that decision in the future and the challenges of being locked into their existing topology. Adding multiple clouds and managing connectivity on an existing MPLS platform is typically slow, costly, and complex. This is the last thing financial organisations want when trying to boost speed and flexibility.

Eric Troyer

Eric Troyer

This is where Software Defined Networks (SDN) and virtual routing services come into their own. They can solve the cloud connectivity problem without requiring financial organisations to rip and replace MPLS networks and manage the expense that comes with that.

Working with an SDN to connect to the cloud helps reduce complexity of IT infrastructure and costs. More importantly, for financial services, SDN can reduce downtime as it helps to virtualise most of the physical networking devices, making it easy to perform an upgrade for one piece rather than needing to do it for several devices.

Virtual routing services, meanwhile, are a great option to solve the complexities and costs that come with connecting an MPLS network to the public cloud. Essentially, it is a way of easily and virtually routing an existing MPLS network to the cloud via an SDN.

Another major consideration for IT leaders is whether their organisation can quickly adapt to peaks and troughs in demand. Increasing bandwidth when needed can be critical to quickly adapting to changes in the stock market, for example. Therefore, financial organisations should ensure that connectivity to the cloud is elastic —  where bandwidth can be turned up or down in an instant This flexibility ensures that core business operations don’t fall down if there are peaks in demand and, equally as important, IT leaders are not paying for unused bandwidth that they don’t need.

Architecting a future-proof cloud infrastructure

There is no question that cloud technology will continue to change the way financial organisations operate. The task for CTOs now is to make sure they can easily get to the cloud, and they can quickly connect the tight-knit ecosystems they rely upon for success. The question CTOs at finance organisations should be asking themselves, therefore, is not what innovation can the cloud drive, but rather how do I make the most of it?  They can expect that connectivity will be a big part of the answer.

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Business

The Impact of Covid-19 on Planning

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The Impact of Covid-19 on Planning 3

By Nilly Essaides, Sherri Liao and Gilles Bonelli, The Hackett Group

The economic consequences of the coronavirus outbreak vary by country and company, but one common factor is that most financial planning and analysis (FP&A) teams have had to go back to the drawing board to revise their forecasting process and update scenario plans. The unprecedented level of disruption in business conditions compels FP&A to abandon their traditional, tedious, bottom-up forecasting processes to produce forward-looking insights faster and more frequently. To accomplish this, FP&A should deploy high-level, cross-functional teams that, by working with a small number of KPIs, can assess how different scenarios are playing out in the market and recalibrate the business outlook.

Forecasting at the speed of change

The human and economic devastation caused by the rapid spread of Covid-19 upended budgets and rendered performance targets obsolete. At most companies, even worst-case scenarios did not account for an event of this magnitude – and for some, their very survival is on the line.

Under normal conditions, forecasting and scenario planning are distinct activities. Forecasting is about understanding where the business is landing compared to expectations (monthly, quarterly or on a rolling basis); scenario planning considers what could happen to the organization given one or more material changes in the business environment. At present, the line between the two is blurring as circumstances can change so fast that it is no longer possible to create a forecast based on past data. In addition, scenario plans must be reviewed frequently to ascertain which are becoming more likely.

Consequently, FP&A teams must exchange their traditional bottom-up, granular approach with a top-down, high-level methodology and conduct the forecast more frequently – but few are set up to accommodate this new process. More often, forecasting involves an all-consuming effort to collect data from business units and functions. To enable a more rapid response, FP&A should assemble a senior-level, cross-functional “SWAT” team with the mandate to review a limited number of KPIs (five to six, at most) in order to build a forecast that can be altered quickly as trigger events validate or disprove scenario plans.

This small team of experts can triage activities effectively while assigning specific areas of responsibility to more junior staff, such as forecasting working capital or discretionary spending. These specialists should work with a set of more granular KPIs. So, while the SWAT team may use a single cash metric, the working-capital team would dive deeper into DSO, DPO and inventory levels.

The first step is to alter the forecasting process, and the next is to adjust the feedback loop created through the management review meeting. Typically, these meetings focus mostly on BU-by-BU, actual-to-forecast and actual-to-budget variance analysis, using historical data. However, for many organizations – particularly those that have experienced a major reset of market demand and ongoing operations – spending time looking back at low-level comparative narratives is unproductive.

Instead, management should spend the bulk of its time reviewing the company’s best-case, minimum-viability and worst-case scenarios to determine which one seems to be playing out. To make sure planners target the right activities, management must ask the right questions: not how the company performed versus budget, but how conditions have changed and how that affects the forecast for emerging supply and demand scenarios.

A revised approach to identifying scenarios

For planning purposes, most companies develop three scenarios: base, best and worst. Given the nature of the Covid-19 crisis, a revised set of scenarios is needed:

  1. Best-case scenario: The best-case scenario should be anchored within tested hypotheses and initially focus on an assessment of demand conditions and capacity constraints. Current data may be mostly qualitative, but it should include insights gleaned from other countries and regions, particularly those exhibiting early signs of recovery.
  2. Minimum-viability scenario: This is the “new” base for companies hard-hit by the crisis or the scenario with minimum acceptable results to key stakeholders while remaining in business. This scenario must include a set of potential cost-reduction options in case conditions deteriorate rapidly. For instance, a minimum-viability scenario may include an X% reduction in workforce based on demand and supply projections.
  3. Worst-case scenario: The coronavirus pandemic may pose an existential risk to some organizations, so FP&A teams must also develop a scenario based on the worst possible conditions, including circumstances that may put the company out of business. In this case, FP&A should identify and monitor indicators that pose the greatest threat to the company’s status as a going concern.

Digging deeper into each scenario

Each key market or country or region should be categorized according to a variety of possible GDP growth scenarios.

A U-shaped recovery assumes the fastest rebound in key countries where GDP quickly reaches or nears pre-Covid-19 levels. These will be geographies where evidence of fast, effective control of the virus’s spread is combined with a strong policy response to prevent structural damage to the area’s economy.

Gilles Bonelli, Associate Principal, The Hackett Group

Gilles Bonelli, Associate Principal, The Hackett Group

A W-shaped recovery assumes a quick, partial recovery followed by a second wave decline in GDP in key countries or regions. These will be cases where evidence of fast, effective control of the virus’s spread is not accompanied by a strong policy response to prevent structural damage to the national economy.

An L-shaped recovery assumes that there will be no rebound in GDP. These will be countries or regions where there is no evidence of effective control of the virus’s spread.

The team should identify specific actions to be taken under each scenario so that management can act as economic conditions unfold. Additionally, FP&A must determine how changes in the environment may affect the company’s commercial and SG&A functions. Further, the trajectory of GDP will vary, driven by the public health and economic response of each country or region. Both inputs will be critical as companies determine how to proceed.

Due to the interdependence of different markets, it is important to consider elements of each in the entire strategic portfolio’s value chain. If a component of the value chain in any strategic portfolio is reliant on activities taking place in countries where a U-shape recovery is expected, then this component should attract more investment compared to those in countries where a slower recovery is likely.

If a component of the value chain in any strategic portfolio is reliant on activities taking place in countries where a W-shape recovery is expected, then investment in this component should be maintained. Accordingly, if a component of the value chain is directed to markets in countries where an L-shape recovery is expected, consider gradually divesting from the portfolio and phasing out related activities.

A catalyst for change

Covid-19 has underscored the discrepancy in planning and analytics capability between top-performing and typical peer-group FP&A organizations. The Hackett Group’s 2018 EPM Performance Study revealed that top-performing FP&A organizations have invested more in technology, which has enabled them to run more analysis and deliver reporting faster and more efficiently. Of top performers, 67% have implemented a primary financial planning and forecasting system to consolidate corporate and country, region or BU information.

Consequently, top-performing teams complete the forecast 3.5 times faster than the peer group and are twice as accurate. These capabilities are essential, as FP&A must provide information more quickly to help make operational decisions. Further, top performers have automated more of their data collection processes and use a standard set of data definitions across categories 92% of the time. This means their staff spend 44% more time analyzing data than collecting it, meaning that the team can redirect capacity to focus on Covid-19-driven demands for information and analysis.

While adoption of rolling forecasts remains generally low, top performers are 55% more likely to have done so than the peer group. Consequently, they can transition more easily from a fixed budget to planning based on a dynamic forecast. Additionally, one-third of forecasts among this group already rely on cross-functional collaboration, almost double the rate of the peer group.

Planning in the age of Covid-19

The coronavirus pandemic’s immediate and long-term repercussions will have a lasting effect on the way organizations plan and forecast, as well as how they approach scenario analysis. Early in the crisis, most FP&A teams had to scramble to adjust forecasting cadence, redraw scenarios, identify new KPIs and establish cross-functional emergency action teams. In contrast, FP&A top performers were able to adjust their existing processes relatively easily.

As companies start to shift from crisis mode to operationalizing changes required by the pandemic, post-crisis scenarios are starting to take shape. Expectations are for a prolonged period of uncertainty and a second wave of infections this fall, however, which makes it imperative that FP&A organizations update their approach to scenario planning immediately.

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