Connect with us

Metalist Launches Digital Asset Exchange

Published

on

gbaf1news

HONG KONG, CHINA – Media_OutReach – 11 June 2019 – Metalist launches a beta version of Digital Asset Exchange for certain countries on June 11th at 3pm. Users are now able to trade BTC, ETH, USDC, LTC, XRP, BAT, CELR, ENJ, HOT, LINK, NPXS, OMG, and ZRX with a safe, reliable, and professional digital asset exchange. More tokens will be listed in the future.
About Metalist Platform: Easy to Use Metalist devotes to build the easiest-to-use platform in iOS, Android, and Web with multiple languages and continues development to improve the user experience.
Reliable System With advanced multilayer, multicluster system architecture, Metalist provides a high availability, high throughput and high security service.
Strong Background Metalist is run by a wholly owned subsidiary of Metaps Inc., listed in Tokyo Stock Exchange. Metaps group provides finance and marketing service in Asia Pacific region and runs the digital asset exchange in South Korea. Metalist leverages the group’s expertise and knowledge about the digital asset exchange.
Robust Control and Compliance Metalist designed and implemented the robust internal controls to secure users’ assets. The Metalist’s internal controls are the highest level in the industry and reviewed by one of the biggest accounting firms. We are compliant with Singapore law and regulation. Metalist operates in compliance with Singapore laws and regulations.
*** About Metalist: *** Metalist is a digital asset exchange, providing global users with spot trading and C2C trading services for the blockchain assets, such as Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin, etc.. Metalist is based in Singapore and run by a wholly owned subsidiary of Metaps Inc., listed in Tokyo Stock Exchange. Further information on Metalist is available on www.metalist.pro.

Technology

Track and Trace and Other Lost Data

Published

on

Track and Trace and Other Lost Data 1

By Ian Smith, General Manager and Finance Director at Invu 

You, like me, were probably amazed by the now infamous loss of the over 16,000 positive test results in the track and trace system due to an Excel spreadsheet error.

You, like me, probably wondered how the Government could get something so important so wrong?

But perhaps we should aks are standing in a greenhouse launching stones?

Data risks from software

Today we are spoilt with software offerings that help us with both our personal and our work lives.

Microsoft Excel is a powerful application and offers many functions now that required moderately complex macro writing in the past, seducing all of us into submitting more data for it to analyse. In finance, we tend to solve all those problems our applications cannot address using Excel.

In finance, we also know the risks of formula errors, and if we have relied on it enough, we will have our own war stories to go with these risks. Yet, we often continue to use the tool for operations that make those folks with an information technology background shake their heads.

These Excel files nowadays may find themselves resident on a local file server or one of the many file servers in the cloud (like those from the big three, DropBox, Google Drive and Microsoft OneDrive or other less well-known file sharing applications). Many of us use these in multiple ways.

Vulnerable programmes

Beyond finance and Excel, there are now many applications that we run our data through and leave data stored in the form of documents, comments and notes.

The long-standing example is email. We today receive many documents via email, with content in the body often providing context. Email systems then become the store for that data. While this works from a personal point of view, for a business working at scale, the information stored this way can be lost to the rest of the business. Just like data falling off a spreadsheet when there are not enough rows to capture the results.

More recently, we have seen easy to consume applications develop in many areas like chat and productivity. Take for example task management apps, my own preference being Monday.com (I am sparing you the long list of these). The result of the task and how we got there, in the form of attachments or comments, are often stored in the application. Each application we touch encourages us to leave a bit of data behind in its store.

Data proliferation

Many of these applications can have a personal use and an initial personal dalliance is what sparks up the motivation to apply the application to a business purpose. Just like the “Track and Trace System”, they can often find themselves being used in an environment where the scale of the operation overwhelms their intended use.

In our business lives, combining the use of applications in this way by liberally sprinkling our data across multiple systems often stored in documents (be they Microsoft Word, email, scans or comments and notes) puts us on the pathway to trouble.

Imagine how Matt Hancock felt explaining to Parliament that the world-class track and trace system depended on a spreadsheet.

Can you imagine a similar situation in your business life? Say, for example, that documents or data in some form was lost because of the use of disparate systems and/or applications that were not really designed for the task you assigned to them.

Who would be your Parliament?

Now you can see yourself in the greenhouse, you may not want to reach for that metaphorical stone.

If these observations create some concerns for you, you may want to consider the information management strategy at your business. You have a strategy, even if it is not addressed specifically in documents, plans or thought processes.

Action plan

These steps may help figure out where you are and where you want to go.

  1. Assess your current environment.

Are you a centraliser, with all the information collected in one place? Or is all your data spread across multiple stores, as identified above? Are you storing your key business information on paper documents, or digitally or a mix of both.

  1. Assess your current processes.

Do your processes run on a limited number of software applications? Or do you enable staff to pick their own tools to get things done? The answer to this question is often a mix of both where staff bridge the gaps in those applications using tools like MS excel. A key application to think about is how the data in email, particularly the attachments, is made available to the business.

  1. Design a pathway for change and implement it.

Start with the end in mind. I suggest the goal is to enable the right people to have the right access to the information they require to do their job in real-time. I believe the way to effectively do this is to go digital. The fork in the road is then whether to centralise your information store or adopt a decentralised approach.

My own preferred route is to centralise using document management software that enables all your documents to be stored in one place. Applications like email can be integrated with it, significantly reducing the workload required to file and store the data. The data can then be used in business applications using workflows. Thinking these workflows through will help you assess the gaps between your key business applications and consider whether tools like excel are being stretched too far.

Continue Reading

Banking

Why ID verification is no longer a barrier to global growth in banking

Published

on

Why ID verification is no longer a barrier to global growth in banking 2

By Barley Laing, UK Managing Director at Melissa

Issues related to effective identity (ID) verification have restricted the global growth of both large banks and smaller challenger fintechs. With its plethora of internationally recognised IDs and verifiable private addresses, the western world is far different from much of the rest of the world, where this type of information does not exist. For example, many people in Africa and Asia lack recognised addresses. This anomaly prevents financial institutions from carrying out vital ID checks as they normally would, meaning they risk missing out on possible expansion into new and often burgeoning markets.

Proliferation of mobile

Smartphone usage is increasing in all corners of the world. Africa is no exception as the continent is  set to see another 300 million new mobile internet subscribers in the next few years. This rise offers an opportunity to financial services organisations based in the west who have been concerned about the ID verification process in countries where ID, as they know it, can be hard to obtain.

While there’s no magic bullet approach to ID verification in these countries, it’s essential to use all the sources of information the mobile device provides to inform the identity of prospective and existing customers. For example, mobile telephone numbers offer a form of digital identity as people rarely change them. These numbers can be used for dual stage verification, such as an SMS sent to the registered user’s mobile number with a unique code to complete the login to a secure website or transfer funds.

Technology is driving secure customer onboarding and ID verification via mobile. Today, prospective customers can use a merchant’s app on their smartphone to scan their identity documents – such as a driver’s licence. The scan can extract the prospect’s data from the Machine Readable Zone (MRZ), saving time while securing the correct data electronically for the financial institution. Checks can then be carried out in real time to verify the document.

The IP address of the mobile device can play a vital role in fraud prevention. It’s possible to match the location of the phone’s IP address with that of the registered owner – where they are known to live or work. If this information matches up, it’s likely the registered user is using the phone. However, suppose the device’s registered owner is based in a country different from the information provided by the phone’s current IP address. In that case, there could be fraudulent activity taking place.

But it’s not just mobile; other new technologies play significant roles in the ID process.

  • Biometrics

Biometrics, which are human physical and behavioural characteristics that can be used to digitally identify a person, are becoming a vital part of the ID verification process. Once a customer has passed the ID checks at the onboarding stage, biometrics – which can operate across all devices – may help confirm the customer’s identity with facial comparison technology. However, basic biometric services can be hackable. For example, fraudsters could obtain the photo of a customer that might enable them to gain access to that person’s account. That is why it is crucial for organisations to use a biometric algorithm that checks for eye movement as part of their ID verification process. This ensures they engage with a real live person, not a static image or avatar, to prevent fraud. Just as important is how biometrics quickly and straightforwardly enable customers to access their account or service without responding to time-consuming security questions or remembering various passwords, thereby shaping a positive experience.

  • Real-time access powers real-time decision making

When onboarding a new customer anywhere in the world, be sure to source a global dataset of billions of records. For real-time ID verification, fraud prevention, and data accuracy purposes, it should allow you to perform sufficient cross checks of the contact information provided by the prospective customers – their name, telephone number, email address, or home address. This dataset must leverage government agency, credit agency, and utility records, where possible, and access politically exposed person (PEP) watch lists.

  • Social media tells a story

Don’t forget that social media such as Facebook and Instagram provide a wealth of knowledge on those who use them. Accessing this data within the parameters of best practice data protection for ID verification purposes helps organisations identify users’ location and transactional behaviour to support the ID verification process and prevent fraud.

Evolving technology – mainly related to mobile – makes fast, accurate, and secure ID verification anywhere in the world a reality. By combining this technology with access to accurate contact data from billions of global consumers in real time, the door is open for forward-thinking financial institutions to move into new global markets and drive strong growth securely.

Continue Reading

Finance

Digital Finance: Unlocking New Capital in Disrupted Markets

Published

on

Digital Finance: Unlocking New Capital in Disrupted Markets 3

By Krishnan Raghunathan, Head of Finance & Accounting Services at WNS, explores how a digitally transformed finance department can give enterprises the ability they need to improve cash flow and revenue through better use of data and improved analytics-driven visibility.  

Businesses everywhere are scrambling to recover lost revenues and protect cash flow. But as countries globally grapple with a dreaded second wave of the pandemic, imposing far more stringent localised lockdowns and new restrictions, it is set to be the hardest winter in living memory for many sectors.

The likelihood of winter peaks, so often the saviour of sectors such as travel and hospitality, benefitting businesses is diminishing rapidly. While many have pivoted to a greater or lesser degree, few have been able to offset the impact of falling revenues on cash flow. Even retail, riding an e-commerce boom in many regions, is finding itself in choppy waters, with 17 percent of consumers switching brands due to the economic pressures and changing priorities caused by the pandemic.

As one McKinsey article notes, “With some companies losing up to 75 percent of their revenues in a single quarter, cash isn’t just king – it’s now critical for survival”. Where then do businesses find new sources of cash to sustain their operations through the coming months?

Tapping Overlooked Cash Opportunities

For many, the answer could depend on whether they have digitally transformed their finance department. Why? Because many organisations are sitting on unidentified opportunities, funds that could be vital in shoring up businesses over the next few months or plugging the gap between operating costs and government bailouts. Yet those that have been slow to start their digital transformation journey are at a disadvantage;. At the same time, it is possible to identify these hidden seams in an analogue organisation, the process is time-consuming, manually intensive and, without the right digital tools, prone to human error.

Where deploying digital tools helps is by bringing speed, automation and reliable data to the fore. Connecting them with digital finance and accounting systems can give businesses clear insights into how money is being spent, where wastage is occurring, and where opportunities for optimisation exist.

Krishnan Raghunathan

Krishnan Raghunathan

It might be something as simple as automating the accuracy checking, issuing and chasing of invoices and late payments. This could reduce errors and invoice disputes and ultimately lead to faster payments. Accuracy and organisation are also important in billing – better records enable faster billing for work completed, and in turn, should deliver quicker payments.

It could also be around having the ability to review the supply chain and procurement data and identify where a supplier is subsidising a larger customer’s product line through drawn-out payment terms, or where a variety of vendors are on different terms across the business.  Using that data and overall knowledge of the business to negotiate better terms that work for both supplier and customer can create new opportunities. It could even be to identify late-paying customers, determine the reason for late payments, and use that intelligence to develop products or financing solutions that continue to support those customers (and improve loyalty) without increasing the burden on the balance sheet.

Generating Reliable Insights for Faster Decision-making

To do any of these manually would take months, generating data slowly that would quickly go out of date. But digital finance departments have evidence they can trust to inform business decision-making. That’s because old, manual processes built around Order-to-Cash lack the flexibility and agility that businesses require in today’s markets. The fact is that even before the global pandemic crisis, the pace of digitisation across all sectors was demanding new approaches to finance and book balance.

The opportunities are significant – from cognitive credit and improved forecasting accuracy to enhanced customer analytics. All use similar tools, based on artificial intelligence and quality, trusted data. Cognitive credit can be deployed to quickly make decisions on whether to advance or restrict credit, based on individual company positions and available data. Doing so enables businesses to either capitalise on opportunities (for instance, agreeing credit for a supplier that has run out but is a supportive and integral partner) or avoid risk (in the cases where a business might be in administration).

With more accurate forecasts, businesses can better manage their currency purchases and deposits, selling currency that is not required or buying more where predictions identify an upcoming demand.

It is the same with customer analytics – with a greater understanding of customer needs, businesses can make decisions based on the right mix of the product (and how it meets demand) and supply chain suitability (such as production costs and location in relation to customers).

In many ways, the events of the past year have accelerated the process. In doing so, the problem is the pandemic has also accelerated the speed at which failure to act can lead to obsolescence. Therefore, it is vital that businesses, and more particularly their finance and accounting departments, kick start their digital transformation. This will enable them to deploy the tools and analytics that is needed to capture data, generate insights and drive fast, accurate decision-making to uncover previously untapped sources of cash and reverse revenue degradation.

The Importance of Digitally Enabled Finance Teams

Forward-thinking CFOs have already begun the process of digitising their departments, but for those that have been slow to start, now is the time to push forward. It is only through digital tools and analytics that finance leaders can identify both the internal and external opportunities to recover revenue and improve cash flow. Whether that’s releasing working capital, minimising revenue loss and accelerating revenue recovery, reducing total cost of ownership or enhancing customer retention – only digitally enabled finance teams will be in a position to capitalise and, ultimately, bolster business performance during what will be a trading period like no other.

Continue Reading
Editorial & Advertiser disclosureOur website provides you with information, news, press releases, Opinion and advertorials on various financial products and services. This is not to be considered as financial advice and should be considered only for information purposes. We cannot guarantee the accuracy or applicability of any information provided with respect to your individual or personal circumstances. Please seek Professional advice from a qualified professional before making any financial decisions. We link to various third party websites, affiliate sales networks, and may link to our advertising partners websites. Though we are tied up with various advertising and affiliate networks, this does not affect our analysis or opinion. When you view or click on certain links available on our articles, our partners may compensate us for displaying the content to you, or make a purchase or fill a form. This will not incur any additional charges to you. To make things simpler for you to identity or distinguish sponsored articles or links, you may consider all articles or links hosted on our site as a partner endorsed link.

Call For Entries

Global Banking and Finance Review Awards Nominations 2020
2020 Global Banking & Finance Awards now open. Click Here

Latest Articles

Track and Trace and Other Lost Data 4 Track and Trace and Other Lost Data 5
Technology20 mins ago

Track and Trace and Other Lost Data

By Ian Smith, General Manager and Finance Director at Invu  You, like me, were probably amazed by the now infamous...

Why ID verification is no longer a barrier to global growth in banking 6 Why ID verification is no longer a barrier to global growth in banking 7
Banking1 hour ago

Why ID verification is no longer a barrier to global growth in banking

By Barley Laing, UK Managing Director at Melissa Issues related to effective identity (ID) verification have restricted the global growth...

Digital Finance: Unlocking New Capital in Disrupted Markets 8 Digital Finance: Unlocking New Capital in Disrupted Markets 9
Finance3 hours ago

Digital Finance: Unlocking New Capital in Disrupted Markets

By Krishnan Raghunathan, Head of Finance & Accounting Services at WNS, explores how a digitally transformed finance department can give enterprises...

Beyond the bottom line: why brands must show they care to connect with customers 10 Beyond the bottom line: why brands must show they care to connect with customers 11
Top Stories4 hours ago

Beyond the bottom line: why brands must show they care to connect with customers

By Vadim Grigoryan, Partner, Lunu Over the past few years, we’ve witnessed an ever-growing activism among consumers, with public opinion...

O-CITY enters Kenya to drive contactless payments across Matatu bus service 12 O-CITY enters Kenya to drive contactless payments across Matatu bus service 13
Finance4 hours ago

O-CITY enters Kenya to drive contactless payments across Matatu bus service

Up to 10,000 buses to become cashless with O-CITY’s M-Pesa-based ticketing solution O-CITY, the automated fare collection provider by BPC,...

Nearly 14 Million1 UK adults more likely to spend on Black Friday than they were last year 14 Nearly 14 Million1 UK adults more likely to spend on Black Friday than they were last year 15
Business4 hours ago

Nearly 14 Million1 UK adults more likely to spend on Black Friday than they were last year

Yolt launches evolved app to help shoppers save whilst they spend Across the UK, consumers are set to spend £6.4bn...

Christmas isn’t cancelled: European shoppers plan to spend more online this Black Friday 16 Christmas isn’t cancelled: European shoppers plan to spend more online this Black Friday 17
Business4 hours ago

Christmas isn’t cancelled: European shoppers plan to spend more online this Black Friday

Half (52%) of European consumers plan to do Christmas shopping around holiday sales, including Black Friday, compared to previous years...

The largest event in e-commerce history? ‘Tis the season 18 The largest event in e-commerce history? ‘Tis the season 19
Top Stories5 hours ago

The largest event in e-commerce history? ‘Tis the season

By James Booth, VP Head of Partnerships for EMEA, at PPRO Sometimes, change happens slowly. Other times it chases you...

Optimum Finance bolsters its offering in three regions with two new sales directors and commercial director promotion 20 Optimum Finance bolsters its offering in three regions with two new sales directors and commercial director promotion 21
Business5 hours ago

Optimum Finance bolsters its offering in three regions with two new sales directors and commercial director promotion

Leading invoice finance provider and fintech firm Optimum Finance has appointed two regional sales directors to fulfil the funding needs of SMEs...

Bank of Idaho Selects Teslar Software to Enhance Customer Service 22 Bank of Idaho Selects Teslar Software to Enhance Customer Service 23
Banking6 hours ago

Bank of Idaho Selects Teslar Software to Enhance Customer Service

Partnership enables bank to spend more time with borrowers, better meet their needs Teslar Software, a provider of automated workflow...

Newsletters with Secrets & Analysis. Subscribe Now