CHRIS BAILES – CONTROL RISKS

Director, Fraud and Financial Crime

  • Developed and led a comprehensive transformational change programme for a business critical arm of a FTSE 50 UK corporate outsourced services company, helping stem contract losses of c£1m a month
  • Advised a FTSE 50 UK corporate on a market entry strategy to help win a government outsource contract to provide services in the UK criminal justice sector;
  • Provided specialist advice to a UK government regulator in respect of cyber-crime and data loss
  • Former Chief Operating Officer at the UK Serious Fraud Office
  • Executive Committee member of the global strategic business intelligence & Investigations team committed to deliver profitable growth for the service

Chris is Director, for Control Risks’ Fraud and Financial Crime services for Europe & Africa. Control Risks is strategic global risk consultancy specialising in helping organisations manage political, integrity and security risks in complex and hostile environments. Chris manages a broad array of complex investigations into fraud, corruption and other ethical breaches, supported by teams in the UK, Germany, France, Russia, Benelux, Nordics, Iberia, and Africa.

Chris Bailes
Chris Bailes

Chris has over 25 years of experience working in the region and has an in-depth understanding of regional business practise and the risk environment. He has an extensive network, working with international regulatory and law enforcement partners across the US, Europe, Africa and Australasia and leading on multi-jurisdictional investigations.

Prior to joining Control Risks Chris was the Chief Operating Officer at the UK Serious Fraud Office where he had day to day responsibility for all operational delivery and investigative capability. This included overseeing specialist divisions leading on bribery and corruption, investment fraud and city fraud as well as proceeds of crime, intelligence and assurance. He also undertook the role of SIRO and had board level responsibility for the organisations legal technologies and digital forensics capability.

During his tenure Chris developed strong and extensive relations with partner agencies in the UK, US and a variety of other jurisdictions. He chaired the UK (Cabinet Office sponsored) Counter Fraud Operations Board bringing together a wide group of interested parties across government, law enforcement and the commercial banking/sector dealing with fraud and economic crime, also advising the UK government on strategy and policy in this regard.

Earlier in his career, Chris led the Immigration Compliance and Enforcement Directorate at the UK Home Office with responsibility for all operational matters involving immigration into, and within the UK. He also led the UK government immigration transformation programme. Chris spent over 20 years in the UK police service, working for most of his time as a detective and specialising in fraud, bribery and corruption and money laundering cases. This included holding the post of head of criminal investigations for a large UK police force.

Chris is a graduate of the UK Royal College of Defence Studies (RCDS) where he studied international relations. He holds a Master of Arts in Business Management. He also earned a Bachelor of Science (Hons) in Criminology and Policing.

About Control Risks:

Control Risks is an independent, strategic global risk consultancy specialising in helping organisations manage political, integrity and security risks in complex and hostile environments. Control Risks support clients by providing expert analysis and in-depth investigations through to handling sensitive political issues and providing practical on-the-ground protection and support.

Control Risks unique combination of services, geographical reach and the trust clients place in the company, ensures they effectively solve clients problems and realise new opportunities across the world. Control Risks works across five continents and with 36 offices worldwide, providing a broad range of services to help clients manage political, integrity and security risk.

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