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Teradata Revenue Increases 18 Percent in Constant Currency

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  • Teradata raises expectations for full-year 2012 EPS and constant currency revenue growth
  • Revenue increased 14 percent, up 18 percent in constant currency(1)
  • Product revenue increased 23 percent in constant currency
  • Record non-GAAP gross margin and operating margin
  • GAAP EPS of $0.65, versus $0.60 in the prior-year period
  • Non-GAAP EPS of $0.77, up 28 percent from the prior-year period(2)
  • Year-to-date cash from operating activities increased $59 million from prior-year period

ATLANTA – Teradata Corporation (NYSE: TDC) today reported revenue of $665 million for the quarter ended June 30, 2012, an increase of 14 percent from $581 million in the second quarter of 2011.  Currency translation reduced the second quarter revenue comparison by 4 percentage points.(1)

Gross margin of 57.4 percent was up from the 54.4 percent reported in the second quarter of 2011.  On a non-GAAP basis, excluding the special items and stock-based compensation expense described in footnote #2,(2) gross margin was 58.5 percent, a 260 basis point improvement from 55.9 percent in the second quarter of 2011.  The increase in gross margin was driven by leverage from revenue growth as well as a favorable product and services revenue mix.

Stock-based compensation expense and special items had a $20 million negative impact on Teradata’s second quarter 2012 net income as reported under U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP).(2)

Teradata reported GAAP net income of $112 million, or $0.65 per diluted share, which compared to GAAP net income of $103 million, or $0.60 per diluted share, in the second quarter of 2011.  Excluding stock-based compensation expense and the special items detailed in footnote #2,(2) non-GAAP net income in the second quarter of 2012 was $132 million, or $0.77 per diluted share, versus $103 million, or $0.60 per diluted share in the second quarter of 2011.(2)

“Teradata delivered another strong quarter in Q2 with revenue growth of 18 percent in constant currency, and Non-GAAP EPS growth of 28 percent.  As a result, we are increasing our guidance for constant currency revenue growth and EPS for 2012,” said Mike Koehler, president and chief executive officer of Teradata Corporation.

“Strong execution across the company led to 20 percent constant currency revenue growth in the first half of 2012 and record operating margin.  Our technology leadership and expertise in data warehousing, big data analytics and integrated marketing management uniquely position Teradata to help customers realize the greatest value from their information assets, while enabling them to reduce infrastructure costs.”

Regional Operating Segment Results
Teradata reports its results in three regional operating segments.

Americas
Teradata generated $398 million of revenue in its Americas region, up 17 percent from $339 million in the second quarter of 2011.  Currency translation reduced the year-over-year revenue comparison for the Americas region by 1 percentage point.(1)

Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA)
Revenue in Teradata’s EMEA region was $168 million, up 16 percent from $145 million generated in the second quarter of 2011.  Currency translation reduced the year-over-year revenue comparison for the EMEA region by 11 percentage points.(1)

Asia Pacific / Japan (APJ)
Teradata generated $99 million of revenue in its APJ region, a 2 percent increase from $97 million in the second quarter of 2011.  Currency translation reduced the year-over-year comparison in the APJ region by 2 percentage points.(1)

Operating Income
Second-quarter operating income of $160 million increased from $110 million reported in the second quarter of 2011.  On a non-GAAP basis, operating income of $188 million increased 31 percent from the second quarter of 2011.(2)  Higher revenue as well as favorable product and services revenue mix more than offset the increased investment in selling expense and research and development.

Cash Flow 
Teradata generated $152 million of cash from operating activities, compared to $179 million in the prior-year period.  Teradata generated $113 million of free cash flow (cash from operating activities less capital expenditures and additions to capitalized software)(3) in the second quarter of 2012, versus $146 million in the same period in 2011. The decline in cash from operating activities and free cash flow was due to the timing of balance sheet related items between the first and second quarters of the respective years.  See the year-to-date information below which normalizes these timing variances.

Year-to-date, Teradata generated $344 million of cash from operating activities, a $59 million increase from $285 million generated in the first half of 2011.  Teradata generated $275 million of free cash flow(3) in the first half of 2012, a $50 million increase from $225 million generated during the same period in 2011.

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Balance Sheet
Teradata ended the second quarter of 2012 with $821 million in cash, a $157 million decrease from March 31, 2012. The net decrease was due in part to acquisition and other investing activities during the quarter.  Additionally, Teradata repurchased approximately 545,000 shares for $37 million during the quarter.

As of June 30, 2012, Teradata had total debt of $296 million outstanding under a term loan.  Additionally, Teradata has $300 million available through a pre-arranged credit facility; however no funds were drawn from the credit facility.
2012 Outlook

Teradata is raising its expectations for constant currency revenue growth from the 13-15 percent revenue range to the 14-16 percent range. However due to currency changes since early May 2012, when Teradata previously provided revenue guidance, Teradata now anticipates that currency translation will negatively impact the year-over-year revenue comparison by an additional percentage point, based on currency rates on July 30, 2012.   As a result Teradata’s expectation for 2012 full-year reported revenue growth remains at 12-14 percent.

Teradata is increasing its guidance for 2012 GAAP earnings per share to the range of $2.34 to $2.44. Excluding stock-based compensation expense and special items, non-GAAP EPS for 2012 is now expected to increase to the range of $2.72 to $2.82, versus prior non-GAAP EPS guidance of $2.60 to $2.70.(2)

2012 Second-Quarter Earnings Conference Call

A conference call is scheduled today at 8:30 a.m. (ET) to discuss the company’s second-quarter 2012 results.  Access to the conference call, as well as a replay of the call, is available on Teradata’s web site at www.teradata.com/investor.
Supplemental financial information regarding Teradata’s operating results is also available on the Investor Relations page of Teradata’s web site.

About Teradata
Teradata Corporation (NYSE: TDC) is the world’s leading analytic data solutions company, focused on integrated data warehousing, big data analytics, and business applications. Teradata’s innovative products and services deliver data integration and business insight to empower organizations to make the best decisions possible for competitive advantage. Visit teradata.com for details.

1.    The impact of currency is determined by calculating the prior-period results using the current-year monthly average currency rates.  See the foreign currency schedule on the Investor Relations page of the company’s web site www.teradata.com/investor.

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2.    Teradata reports its results in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles in the United States, or GAAP.  However, as described below, the company believes that certain non-GAAP measures (such as non-GAAP gross margin, non-GAAP operating income, non-GAAP net income, and non-GAAP earnings per diluted share, or EPS, which exclude certain items as well as free cash flow) are useful for investors.  Our non-GAAP measures are not meant to be considered in isolation or as substitutes for, or superior to results determined in accordance with GAAP, and should be read only in conjunction with our condensed consolidated financial statements prepared in accordance with GAAP.

Special items included in Teradata’s second quarter GAAP operating income results as reported in this release included $8 million of amortization of acquisition-related intangible assets; $1 million of acquisition-related purchase accounting adjustments; $9 million of acquisition transaction and integration expenses; and $10 million of stock-based compensation expense.

The following tables reconcile Teradata’s actual and projected results and EPS, under GAAP to the company’s actual and projected non-GAAP results and EPS for the periods presented, which exclude certain items.  Our management regularly uses supplemental non-GAAP financial measures, such as gross margin, operating income, net income and EPS, excluding certain items internally, to understand, manage and evaluate our business and support operating decisions.  The company believes such non-GAAP financial measures (1) provide useful information to investors regarding the underlying business trends and performance of the company’s ongoing operations, (2) are useful for period-over-period comparisons of such operations and results, that may be more easily compared to peer companies and allow investors a view of the company’s operating results excluding special items, (3) provide useful information to management and investors regarding present and future business trends, and (4) provide consistency and comparability with past reports and projections of future results.

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3.    As described above, the company believes that free cash flow is a useful non-GAAP measure for investors.  Teradata defines free cash flow as cash provided/used by operating activities less capital expenditures for property and equipment, and additions to capitalized software.  Free cash flow does not have a uniform definition under GAAP and therefore, Teradata’s definition may differ from other companies’ definitions of this measure.  Teradata’s management uses free cash flow to assess the financial performance of the company and believes it is useful for investors because it relates the operating cash flow of the company to the capital that is spent to continue and improve business operations.
In particular, free cash flow indicates the amount of cash generated after capital expenditures for, among other things, investment in the company’s existing businesses, strategic acquisitions, strengthening the company’s balance sheet, repurchase of the company’s stock and repayment of the company’s debt obligations, if any.  Free cash flow does not represent the residual cash flow available for discretionary expenditures since there may be other nondiscretionary expenditures that are not deducted from the measure. This non-GAAP measure is not meant to be considered in isolation or as a substitute for, or superior to results determined in accordance with GAAP, and should be read only in conjunction with our condensed consolidated financial statements prepared in accordance with GAAP.

Note to Investors
This news release contains forward-looking statements, including statements as to anticipated or expected results, beliefs, opinions and future financial performance, within the meaning of Section 21E of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934.  Forward-looking statements include projections of revenue, profit growth and other financial items, future economic performance and statements concerning analysts’ earnings estimates, among other things.  These forward-looking statements are based on current expectations and assumptions and involve risks and uncertainties that could cause Teradata’s actual results to differ materially. In addition to the factors discussed in this release, other risks and uncertainties could affect our future results, and could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed in such forward-looking statements.  Such factors include those relating to: the global economic environment in general or on the ability of our suppliers to meet their commitments to us, or the timing of purchases by our current and potential customers, and other general economic and business conditions; the rapidly changing and intensely competitive nature of the information technology industry and the data warehousing business, including the increased pressure on price/performance for data warehousing solutions; fluctuations in our operating results, unanticipated delays or accelerations in our sales cycles and the difficulty of accurately estimating revenues; risks inherent in operating in foreign countries, including the impact of economic, political, legal, regulatory, compliance, cultural, foreign currency fluctuations and other conditions abroad; the timely and successful development, production or acquisition and market acceptance of new and existing products and services, including our ability to accelerate market acceptance of new products and services as well as the reliability, quality and operability of new products because of the difficulty and complexity associated with their testing and production; tax rates; turnover of workforce and the ability to attract and retain skilled employees; availability and successful exploitation of new acquisition and alliance opportunities; our ability to execute integration plans for newly acquired entities, including the possibility that expected synergies and operating efficiencies may not be achieved, that such integration efforts may be more difficult, time-consuming or costly than expected, and that operating costs, customer loss and business disruption (including, without limitation, difficulties in maintaining relationships with employees, customers, clients or suppliers) may be greater than expected following the transaction; recurring revenue may decline or fail to be renewed; changes in Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and the resulting impact, if any, on the company’s accounting policies; continued efforts to establish and maintain best-in-class internal information technology and control systems; and other factors described from time-to-time in the company’s filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, including its annual report on Form 10-K and subsequent quarterly reports on Forms 10-Q, as well as the company’s annual reports to stockholders.  The company does not undertake any obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

For media information:

Mike O’Sullivan
(937) 242-4786
[email protected]

For investor information:

Gregg Swearingen
(937) 242-4600
[email protected]

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The Future of Software Supply Chain Security: A focus on open source management

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The Future of Software Supply Chain Security: A focus on open source management 1

By Emile Monette, Director of Value Chain Security at Synopsys

Software Supply Chain Security: change is needed

Attacks on the Software Supply Chain (SSC) have increased exponentially, fueled at least in part by the widespread adoption of open source software, as well as organisations’ insufficient knowledge of their software content and resultant limited ability to conduct robust risk management. As a result, the SSC remains an inviting target for would-be attackers. It has become clear that changes in how we collectively secure our supply chains are required to raise the cost, and lower the impact, of attacks on the SSC.

A report by Atlantic Council found that “115 instances, going back a decade, of publicly reported attacks on the SSC or disclosure of high-impact vulnerabilities likely to be exploited” in cyber-attacks were implemented by affecting aspects of the SSC. The report highlights a number of alarming trends in the security of the SSC, including a rise in the hijacking of software updates, attacks by state actors, and open source compromises.

This article explores the use of open source software – a primary foundation of almost all modern software – due to its growing prominence, and more importantly, its associated security risks. Poorly managed open source software exposes the user to a number of security risks as it provides affordable vectors to potential attackers allowing them to launch attacks on a variety of entities—including governments, multinational corporations, and even the small to medium-sized companies that comprise the global technology supply chain, individual consumers, and every other user of technology.

The risks of open source software for supply chain security

The 2020 Open Source Security and Risk Analysis (OSSRA) report states that “If your organisation builds or simply uses software, you can assume that software will contain open source. Whether you are a member of an IT, development, operations, or security team, if you don’t have policies in place for identifying and patching known issues with the open source components you’re using, you’re not doing your job.”

Open source code now creates the basic infrastructure of most commercial software which supports enterprise systems and networks, thus providing the foundation of almost every software application used across all industries worldwide. Therefore, the need to identify, track and manage open source code components and libraries has risen tremendously.

License identification, patching vulnerabilities and introducing policies addressing outdated open source packages are now all crucial for responsible open source use. However, the use of open source software itself is not the issue. Because many software engineers ‘reuse’ code components when they are creating software (this is in fact a widely acknowledged best practice for software engineering), the risk of those components becoming out of date has grown. It is the use of unpatched and otherwise poorly managed open source software that is really what is putting organizations at risk.

Emile Monette

Emile Monette

The 2020 OSSRA report also reveals a variety of worrying statistics regarding SSC security. For example, according to the report, it takes organisations an unacceptably long time to mitigate known vulnerabilities, with 2020 being the first year that the  Heartbleed vulnerability was not found in any commercial software analyzed for the OSSRA report. This is six years after the first public disclosure of Heartbleed – plenty of time for even the least sophisticated attackers to take advantage of the known and publicly reported vulnerability.

The report also found that 91% of the investigated codebases contained components that were over four years out of date or had no developments made in the last two years, putting these components at a higher risk of vulnerabilities. Additionally, vulnerabilities found in the audited codebases had an average age of almost 4 ½ years, with 19% of vulnerabilities being over 10 years old, and the oldest vulnerability being a whopping 22 years old. Therefore, it is clear that open source users are not adequately defending themselves against open source enabled cyberattacks. This is especially concerning as 99% of the codebases analyzed in the OSSRA report contained open source software, with 75% of these containing at least one vulnerability, and 49% containing high-risk vulnerabilities.

Mitigating open source security risks

In order to mitigate security risks when using open source components, one must know what software you’re using, and which exploits impact its vulnerabilities. One way to do this is to obtain a comprehensive bill of materials from your suppliers (also known as a “build list” or a “software bill of materials” or “SBOM”). Ideally, the SBOM should contain all the open source components, as well as the versions used, the download locations for all projects and dependencies, the libraries which the code calls to, and the libraries that those dependencies link to.

Creating and communicating policies

Modern applications contain an abundance of open source components with possible security, code quality and licensing issues. Over time, even the best of these open source components will age (and newly discovered vulnerabilities will be identified in the codebase), which will result in them at best losing intended functionality, and at worst exposing the user to cyber exploitation.

Organizations should ensure their policies address updating, licensing, vulnerability management and other risks that the use of open source can create. Clear policies outlining introduction and documentation of new open source components can improve the control of what enters the codebase and that it complies with the policies.

Prioritizing open source security efforts

Organisations should prioritise open source vulnerability mitigation efforts in relation to CVSS (Common Vulnerability Scoring System) scores and CWE (Common Weakness Enumeration) information, along with information about the availability of exploits, paying careful attention to the full life cycle of the open source component, instead of only focusing on what happens on “day zero.” Patch priorities should also be in-line with the business importance of the asset patched, the risk of exploitation and the criticality of the asset. Similarly, organizations must consider using sources outside of the CVSS and CWE information, many of which provide early notification of vulnerabilities, and in particular, choosing one that delivers technical details, upgrade and patch guidance, as well as security insights. Lastly, it is important for organisations to monitor for new threats for the entire time their applications remain in service.

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On the Frontlines of Fraud: Tactics for Merchants to Protect Their Businesses

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On the Frontlines of Fraud: Tactics for Merchants to Protect Their Businesses 2

By Nicole Jass, Senior Vice President of Small Business and Fraud Products at FIS

Fraud isn’t new, but the new realities brought by COVID-19 for merchants, and the rising tide of attacks have changed the way we need to approach the fight. Even before the pandemic broke out earlier this year, the transition to digital payments was well underway, which means fighting fraud needs a multilayered, multi-channel approach. Not only do you want to increase approval rates, you want to protect your revenue and stop fraud before it happens.

A great place to start is working with your payment partners to refresh your company’s fraud strategies with emerging top three best practices:

  1. AI-based machine learning fraud solutions helps your business stay ahead of fraud trends. Leveraging data profiles to model both “good” and “bad” behavior helps find and reduce fraud. AI-based machine learning will be increasingly essential to stay ahead of the explosive and sophisticated eCommerce fraud.
  2. Increasing capabilities around device fingerprinting and behavioral data are essential to detect fraud before it happens. While much of the user-input values can be easily manipulated to look more authentic, device fingerprinting and behavioral data are captured in the background to derive unique details from the user’s device and behavior. Bringing in more unique elements into decisioning, can help authenticate the users and determine the validity of the transactions.
  3. Prioritize user authentication. User authentication is a vital linchpin in any fraud defense and should receive even greater priority today. Setting strong password requirements and implementing multi-factor authentication helps curb fraud attacks from account takeover.

As well as working with your payment partners it’s more critical than ever to protect online transactions while not jeopardizing legitimate purchases. Fortunately, there are a few things you can do right now to address these concerns:

  1. Monitor warning signs

Payment verification is an important part of protecting your business. There are a variety of strategies to employ including implementing technology utilizing artificial intelligence and machine learning to help catch certain patterns. In addition to technology, here are a few other tips that may serve as warning signs. These are not a guarantee fraud is occurring, but they are flags to investigate.

o   The shipping address and billing address differ

o   Multiple orders of the same item

o   Unusually large orders

o   Multiple orders to the same address with different cards

o   Unexpected international orders

  1. Require identity verification

Finding a balance between protection and ease of purchase will ultimately help you protect your customers and your business. The following tactics can make it more difficult for fraudsters to be successful:

o   For customers that have a login, require a minimum of eight characters as well as the use of special characters in your customers’ passwords

o   Set up Two-Factor Authentication that requires a One-time Passcode (OTP) via SMS or email

o   Use biometric authentication for mobile purchases or logins

  1. Monitor chargebacks

Keeping good records is essential for eCommerce. If a customer initiates a dispute, your only available recourse is to provide proof that the order was fulfilled. Be prepared to provide all the supporting information about a disputed transaction. Worldpay’s Disputes solutions can connect to your CRM and provide you dual-layer protection against friendly fraud, first deflecting them before they arise and then fully managing chargeback defenses on your behalf.

  1. Monitor declines

Credit card issuers mitigate fraud by automatically declining payments that look suspicious, based on unusual card activity such as drastic changes in spending patterns or uncommon geolocations of spending. You can check your own declined payment history to help spot a potential problem. When volumes increase, the help of a payments fraud management partner is beneficial.

  1. Protect your own wallet

While you take the steps to protect your business, it’s also important to be mindful of your own protection—it’s incumbent on all responsible consumers to be vigilant about their data. Whether it’s simple awareness of how the fraudsters are operating today, sticking to trusted brands when shopping online, and thinking twice about what data you share and who you share it with, you’ll soon see how often you are sharing personal information about yourself.

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Using payments to streamline everyday transport

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Using payments to streamline everyday transport 3

By Venceslas Cartier, Global Head of Transportation & Smart Mobility at Ingenico Enterprise Retail

Once upon a time the only way to get from A to B on public transport was with cash – and likely a pre-paid ticket bought from a physical office. Nowadays, thanks to technological developments, options range from contactless and mobile payments, to in-app tickets and more. As payment methods advance, consumers and merchants are naturally moving towards Mobility as a Service (MaaS) systems, integrating various forms of transport services into a single mobility service, accessible on demand.

This move towards MaaS does not only streamline the consumer experience, it has other positive impacts too. Incentivising public transport use reduces environmental pollution, improves mental wellbeing by reducing travel-related stress, and aids productivity by freeing up time otherwise spent driving. With this in mind, let’s take a look at the current trends affecting the transport sector, as well as how payments can optimise transportation for both operators and consumers alike.

Optimising transport with payments

The payment process is integral to any service. A payment service provider (PSP) can provide a range of key benefits to operators by proving a gateway to the transportation open payment ecosystem, and ensuring they meet objectives in 3 key areas.

  1. Environmentally, by reducing the use of personal cars and alleviating pollution and congestion.
  2. Societally, making urban mobility more inclusive in terms of improving access to all areas and for all socioeconomic classes.
  3. Economically, by optimising investment in eco-structure and fostering financial transactions, therefore improving the wealth of the city.

Payments professionals’ expertise and technological solutions can make payments easy again for transport operators. They can provide a range of options so that the customer can choose which one is right for them, leveraging the capabilities of the mobility services’ infrastructure (contactless, mobile wallets, P2P, closed-loop, QR code, and blockchain).

Furthermore, they can help promote inclusion and sustainable urban development. For example, methods such as prepaid virtual cards, or mobility accounts linked to a prepaid account can reduce the risks of excluding the unbanked. The environmental impact per kilometre can also be reduced, along with the use of vehicles with lower emissions per person per kilometre.

Finally, PSPs can put merchants’ minds at ease, providing payment liability, allowing aggregation of all due amounts from all mobility service providers, and collecting payments in one single transaction from users while dispatching revenue between mobility service providers.

Managing coronavirus

Venceslas Cartier

Venceslas Cartier

COVID-19’s disruption to the travel industry cannot be overlooked. In fact, research suggests that public transit ridership is down 70% across the globe since the onset of the virus, longer distance travel has seen reductions of up to 90%, and payment by cash has seen a 60% drop.

Being realistic, these behavioural shifts are unlikely to revert anytime soon, so it’s important for merchants to keep this in mind when thinking about payment methods. More than 70% of consumers and travellers say they are likely to avoid the use of cash over the next six months. As a result, more than 40 countries have already raised their contactless payment threshold, further helping consumers to avoid contact with frequently touched pin pads.

However, the pandemic has only accelerated the way things were heading already and highlighted the benefits. Within the context of the pandemic, transportation needs to reinvent itself and adapt its processes to suit the shift in commuter habits that we’ve already seen and will continue to see in the future.

Other trends to keep an eye on

Contactless has been steadily growing on the transport scene, as have mobile payments and in-app purchases. In fact, the recent move to mobile and online ticketing is the most promising method so far, having seen significant growth in the last few years and having been accelerated by COVID-19 as discussed above. Once consumers move to these easy, convenient, and seamless methods, it’s rare that they revert – so it’s a good idea for operators to think how they can cater to these preferences.

Speed and convenience are a must for busy travellers – but not at the expense of data security. Finding the right payments partner is therefore crucial so operators can safeguard their customers’ personal data, while also keeping on top of other security regulations/features such as P2P encryption, PCI certification, and tokenisation.

Next steps for operators

Public transport is essential for many peoples’ everyday lives – COVID-19 or no COVID-19. As such, mobility service providers can make a great difference to their service and operations by implementing the right solutions.

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