Editorial & Advertiser Disclosure Global Banking And Finance Review is an independent publisher which offers News, information, Analysis, Opinion, Press Releases, Reviews, Research reports covering various economies, industries, products, services and companies. The content available on globalbankingandfinance.com is sourced by a mixture of different methods which is not limited to content produced and supplied by various staff writers, journalists, freelancers, individuals, organizations, companies, PR agencies Sponsored Posts etc. The information available on this website is purely for educational and informational purposes only. We cannot guarantee the accuracy or applicability of any of the information provided at globalbankingandfinance.com with respect to your individual or personal circumstances. Please seek professional advice from a qualified professional before making any financial decisions. Globalbankingandfinance.com also links to various third party websites and we cannot guarantee the accuracy or applicability of the information provided by third party websites. Links from various articles on our site to third party websites are a mixture of non-sponsored links and sponsored links. Only a very small fraction of the links which point to external websites are affiliate links. Some of the links which you may click on our website may link to various products and services from our partners who may compensate us if you buy a service or product or fill a form or install an app. This will not incur additional cost to you. A very few articles on our website are sponsored posts or paid advertorials. These are marked as sponsored posts at the bottom of each post. For avoidance of any doubts and to make it easier for you to differentiate sponsored or non-sponsored articles or links, you may consider all articles on our site or all links to external websites as sponsored . Please note that some of the services or products which we talk about carry a high level of risk and may not be suitable for everyone. These may be complex services or products and we request the readers to consider this purely from an educational standpoint. The information provided on this website is general in nature. Global Banking & Finance Review expressly disclaims any liability without any limitation which may arise directly or indirectly from the use of such information.

Over a third of Brits think the UK will be cashless in 10 years or less

Online research from Equifax, the consumer and business insights expert, reveals over a third (37%) of Brits believe the UK will be a cashless society within the next 10 years. Over half (53%) of 16-34 years olds believe we’ll be reliant on digital and card payments by 2028, compared to  just 22% of those aged 55 or above.

However the research shows that while the use of cash is declining1, it still has its fans.

In the survey, conducted with Gorkana, respondents said coins are their top payment choice for vending machines (60%), parking meters (57%), charity donations (53%), and buses (52%), and paying with notes is the preference for taxis (42%).

While 46% of people use cash less often that they did three years ago, more than half (54%) of respondents use cash either as or more often, and almost three in five (59%) think shops, cafes or market stalls that only accept cash are convenient.

The findings also highlight that although the use of digital payments via contactless cards and online transactions is growing rapidly1, some people are still wary about security. Over a quarter (27%) of respondents don’t feel confident payments via websites or contactless cards are secure, and 26% think it’s difficult to track money spent using digital methods.

Sarah Lewis, Head of ID and Fraud at Equifax, said: “We’re in the midst of an exciting smart payments revolution. We can pay for our lunch with our watches and passers-by are now able to donate to buskers via contactless. This growth of new payment technologies is drawing us closer to a cashless society, but long standing preferences for cash remain in certain situations, particularly among older consumers.

“The shift to digital payments in the new economy raises important questions about the role of different payment methods, and highlights the need to balance the convenience people want with security. As digital and online payments continue to grow, so too does the associated fraud. It’s vital that new technology is maximised to give people the reassurance they need as they change the way they spend.”