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List of Country Dialing Codes

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gbaf1news
Country Name Country Code
Afghanistan + 93
Albania 355
Algeria 213
American Samoa 684
Andorra 376
Angola 244
Anguilla +1-264
Antarctica 672
Antigua + 1-268
Argentina 54
Armenia 374
Aruba 297
Ascension 247
Australia 61
Australian External Territories 672
Austria 43
Azerbaijan 994
Bahamas +1-242
Bahrain 973
Bangladesh 880
Barbados +1-246
Barbuda +1-268
Belarus 375
Belgium 32
Belize 501
Benin 229
Bermuda +1-441
Bhutan 975
Bolivia 591
Bosnia & Herzegovina 387
Botswana 267
Brazil 55
British Virgin Islands +1-284
Brunei Darussalam 673
Bulgaria 359
Burkina Faso 226
Burundi 257
Cambodia 855
Cameroon 237
Canada 1
Cape Verde Islands 238
Cayman Islands +1-345
Central African Republic 236
Chad 235
Chatham Island (New Zealand) 64
Chile 56
China (PRC) 86
Christmas Island 53
(08 from Australia)
Cocos-Keeling Islands 61
Colombia 57
Comoros 269
Congo 242
Congo, Dem. Rep. of  ( former  Zaire) 243
Cook Islands 682
Costa Rica 506
Côte d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast) 225
Croatia 385
Cuba 53
Cuba (Guantanamo Bay) 5399
Curaçao 599
Cyprus 357
Czech Republic 420
Denmark 45
Diego Garcia 246
Djibouti 253
Dominica -766
Dominican Republic +1-809 and +1-829
East Timor 670
Easter Island 56
Ecuador 593
Egypt 20
El Salvador 503
Ellipso (Mobile Satellite service) +8812, +8813
EMSAT (Mobile Satellite service) 88213
Equatorial Guinea 240
Eritrea 291
Estonia 372
Ethiopia 251
Falkland Islands (Malvinas) 500
Faroe Islands 298
Fiji Islands 679
Finland 358
France 33
French Antilles 596
French Guiana 594
French Polynesia 689
Gabonese Republic 241
Gambia 220
Georgia 995
Germany 49
Ghana 233
Gibraltar 350
Global Mobile Satellite System (GMSS) 881
ICO Global 8810,8811
Ellipso 8812, 8813
Iridium 8816, 8817
Globalstar 8818, 8819
Globalstar (Mobile Satellite Service) +8818, +8819
Greece 30
Greenland 299
Grenada -472
Guadeloupe 590
Guam -670
Guantanamo Bay 5399
Guatemala 502
Guinea-Bissau 245
Guinea 224
Guyana 592
Haiti 509
Honduras 504
Hong Kong 852
Hungary 36
ICO Global (Mobile Satellite Service) +8810, +8811
Iceland 354
India 91
Indonesia 62
International Freephone Service 800
International Shared Cost Service (ISCS) 808
Iran 98
Iraq 964
Ireland 353
Iridium (Mobile Satellite service) +8816, +8817
Israel 972
Italy 39
Jamaica -875
Japan 81
Jordan 962
Kazakhstan 7
Kenya 254
Kiribati 686
Korea (North) 850
Korea (South) 82
Kuwait 965
Kyrgyz Republic 996
Laos 856
Latvia 371
Lebanon 961
Lesotho 266
Liberia 231
Libya 218
Liechtenstein 423
Lithuania 370
Luxembourg 352
Macao 853
Macedonia (Former Yugoslav Rep of.) 389
Madagascar 261
Malawi 265
Malaysia 60
Maldives 960
Mali Republic 223
Malta 356
Marshall Islands 692
Martinique 596
Mauritania 222
Mauritius 230
Mayotte Island 269
Mexico 52
Micronesia, (Federal States of) 691
Midway Island -807
Moldova 373
Monaco 377
Mongolia 976
Montenegro 382
Montserrat +1-664
Morocco 212
Mozambique 258
Myanmar 95
Namibia 264
Nauru 674
Nepal 977
Netherlands 31
Netherlands Antilles 599
Nevis +1-869
New Caledonia 687
New Zealand 64
Nicaragua 505
Niger 227
Nigeria 234
Niue 683
Norfolk Island 672
Northern Marianas Islands (Saipan, Rota, & Tinian) 669
Norway 47
Oman 968
Pakistan 92
Palau 680
Palestinian Settlements 970
Panama 507
Papua New Guinea 675
Paraguay 595
Peru 51
Philippines 63
Poland 48
Portugal 351
Puerto Rico +1-787 or +1-939
Qatar 974
Réunion Island 262
Romania 40
Russia 7
Rwandese Republic 250
St. Helena 290
St. Kitts/Nevis +1-869
St. Lucia +1-758
St. Pierre & Miquelon 508
St. Vincent & Grenadines +1-784
Samoa 685
San Marino 378
São Tomé and Principe 239
Saudi Arabia 966
Senegal 221
Serbia 381
Seychelles Republic 248
Sierra Leone 232
Singapore 65
Slovak Republic 421
Slovenia 386
Solomon Islands 677
Somali Democratic Republic 252
South Africa 27
Spain 34
Sri Lanka 94
Sudan 249
Suriname 597
Swaziland 268
Sweden 46
Switzerland 41
Syria 963
Taiwan 886
Tajikistan 992
Tanzania 255
Thailand 66
Thuraya (Mobile Satellite service) 88216
Timor Leste 670
Togolese Republic 228
Tokelau 690
Tonga Islands 676
Trinidad & Tobago +1-868
Tunisia 216
Turkey 90
Turkmenistan 993
Turks and Caicos Islands +1-649
Tuvalu 688
Uganda 256
Ukraine 380
United Arab Emirates 971
United Kingdom 44
United States of America 1
US Virgin Islands +1-340
Universal Personal Telecommunications (UPT) 878
Uruguay 598
Uzbekistan 998
Vanuatu 678
Vatican City +39, +379
Venezuela 58
Vietnam 84
Wake Island 808
Wallis and Futuna Islands 681
Yemen 967
Zambia 260
Zanzibar 255
Zimbabwe 263

Trading

How has the online trading landscape changed in 2020?

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How has the online trading landscape changed in 2020? 1

By Dáire Ferguson, CEO, AvaTrade 

This year has been all about change following the outbreak of coronavirus and the subsequent global economic downturn which has impacted nearly every aspect of personal and business life. The online trading world has been no exception to this change as volatility in the financial markets has soared.

Although the global markets have been on a rollercoaster for some time with various geopolitical tensions, the market swings that we have witnessed since March have undoubtedly been unlike anything seen before. While these are indeed challenging times, for the online trading community, the increased volatility has proven tempting for those looking to profit handsomely.

However, with the opportunity to make greater profits also comes the possibility to make a loss, so how has 2020 changed the online trading landscape and how can retail investors stay safe?

Lockdown boost

Interest rates offered by banks and other traditional forms of consumer investments have been uninspiring for some time, but with the current economic frailty, the Bank of England cut interest rates to an all-time low. This has left many people in search of more exciting and rewarding ways to grow their savings which is indeed something online trading can provide.

When the pandemic hit earlier this year, it was widely reported that user numbers for online trading rocketed due to disappointing savings rates but also because the enforced lockdown gave more people the time to learn a new skill and educate themselves on online trading.

Dáire Ferguson

Dáire Ferguson

A volatile market certainly offers great scope for profit and new sources of revenue for those that are savvy enough to put their convictions to the test. However, where people stand the chance to profit greatly from market volatility, there is also the possibility to make a loss, particularly for those that are new to online trading or who are still developing their understanding of the market.

The sharp rise in online trading over lockdown paired with this year’s unpredictable global economy has led to some financial losses, but with a number of risk management tools now available this does not necessarily have to be the case.

Protect your assets

Although not yet widely available across the retail market, risk management tools are slowly becoming more prevalent and being offered by online traders as an extra layer of security for those seeking to trade in riskier climates.

There are a range of options available for traders, but amongst the common tools are “take profit” orders in conjunction with “stop loss” orders. A take profit order is a type of limit order that specifies the exact price for traders to close out an open position for a profit, and if the price of the security does not reach the limit price, the take profit order will not be fulfilled. A stop loss order can limit the trader’s loss on a security position by buying or selling a stock when it reaches a certain price.

Take profit and stop loss orders are good for mitigating risk, but for those that are new to the game or who would prefer extra support, there are even some risk management tools, such as AvaProtect, that provide total protection against loss for a defined period. This means that if the market moves in the wrong direction than originally anticipated, traders can recoup their losses, minus the cost of taking out the protection.

Not a day has gone by this year without the news prompting a change in the financial markets. Until a cure for the coronavirus is discovered, we are unlikely to return to ‘normal’ and the global markets will continue to remain highly volatile. In addition, later this year we will witness one of the most critical US presidential elections in history and the UK’s transition period for Brexit will come to an end. The outcome of these events may well trigger further volatility.

Of course, this may also encourage more people to dip their toes into online trading for a chance to profit. As more people take an interest and sign up to online trading platforms, providers will certainly look to increase or improve the risk management tools on offer to try and keep new users on board, and this could spell a new era for the online trading world.

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Trading

Trading Strategies

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Trading Strategies 2

By Paddy Osborn, Academic Dean, London Academy of Trading

Whether you’re negotiating a business deal, playing a sport or trading financial markets, it’s vital that you have a plan. Top golfers will have a strategy to get around the course in the fewest number of shots possible, and without this plan, their score will undoubtedly be worse. It’s the same with trading. You can’t just open a trading account and trade off hunches and hopes. You need to create a structured and robust plan of attack. This will not only improve your profitability, but will also significantly reduce your stress levels during the decision-making process.

In my opinion, there are four stages to any trading strategy.

S – Set-up

T – Trigger

E – Execution

M – Management

Good trading performance STEMs from a structured trading process, so you should have one or more specific rules for each stage of this process.

Before executing any trades, you need to decide on your criteria for making your trading decisions. Should you base your trades off fundamental analysis, or maybe political news or macroeconomic data? If so, then you need to understand these subjects and how markets react to specific news events.

Alternatively, of course, there’s technical analysis, whereby you base your decisions off charts and previous price action, but again, you need a set of specific rules to enable you to trade with a consistent strategy. Many traders combine both fundamental and technical analysis to initiate their positions, which, I believe, has merit.

Set-up

What needs to happen for you to say “Ah, this looks interesting! Here’s a potential trade.”? It may be a news event, a major macro data announcement (such as interest rates, employment data or inflation), or a chart level breakout. The key ingredient throughout is to fix specific and measurable rules (not rough guidelines that can be over-ridden on a whim with an emotional decision). For me, I may take a view on the potential direction of an asset (i.e. whether to be long or short) through fundamental analysis, but the actual execution of the trade is always technical, based off a very specific set of rules.

To take a simple example, let’s assume an asset has been trending higher, but has stopped at a certain price, let’s say 150. The chart is telling us that, although buyers are in long-term control, sellers are dominant at 150, willing to sell each time the price touches this level. However, the uptrend may still be in place, since each time the price pulls back from the 150 level, the selling is weaker and the price makes a higher short-term low. This clearly suggests that upward pressure remains, and there’s potential to profit from the uptrend if the price breaks higher.

Trigger

Once you’ve found a potential new trade set-up, the next step is to decide when to pull the trigger on the trade. However, there are two steps to this process… finger on trigger, then pull the trigger to execute.

Paddy Osborn

Paddy Osborn

Continuing the example above, the trigger would be to buy if the price breaks above the resistance level at 150. This would indicate that the sellers at 150 have been exhausted, and the buyers have re-established control of the uptrend.  Also, it is often the case that after pause in a trend such as this, the pent-up buying returns and the price surges higher. So the trigger for this trade is a breakout above 150.

Execution

We have a finger on the trigger, but now we need to decide when to squeeze it. What if the price touches 150.10 for 10 seconds only? Has our resistance level broken sufficiently to execute the trade? I’d say not, so you need to set rules to define exactly how far the price needs to break above 150 – or for how long it needs to stay above 150 – for you to execute the trade. You’re basically looking for sufficient evidence that the uptrend is continuing. Of course, the higher the price goes (or the longer it stays above 150), the more confident you can be that the breakout is valid, but the higher price you will need to pay. There’s no perfect solution to this decision, and it depends on many things, such as the amount of other supporting evidence that you have, your levels of aggression, and so on. The critical point here is to fix a set of specific rules and stick to those rules every time.

Management

Good trade management can save a bad trade, while poor trade management can turn an excellent trade entry into a loser. I could talk for days about in-trade management, since there are many different methods you can use, but the essential ingredient for every trade is a stop loss. This is an order to exit your position for a loss if the market doesn’t perform as expected. By setting a stop loss, you can fix your maximum risk on a trade, which is essential to preserving your capital and managing your overall risk limits. Some traders set their stop loss and target levels and let the trade run to its conclusion, while others manage their trades more actively, trailing stop losses, taking interim profits, or even adding to winning positions. No matter how you decide to manage each trade, it must be the same every time, following a structured and robust process.

Review

The final step in the process is to review every trade to see if you can learn anything, particularly from your losing trades. Are you sticking to your trading rules? Could you have done better? Should you have done the trade in the first place? Only by doing these reviews will you discover any patterns of errors in your trading, and hence be able to put them right. In this way, it’s possible to monitor the success of your strategy. If your trades are random and emotional, with lots of manual intervention, then there’s no fixed process for you to review. You also need to be honest with yourself, and face up to your bad decisions in order to learn from them.

In this way, using a structured and robust trading strategy, you’ll be able to develop your trading skills – and your profits – without the stress of a more random approach.

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Economic recovery likely to prove a ‘stuttering’ affair

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Economic recovery likely to prove a ‘stuttering’ affair 3

By Rupert Thompson, Chief Investment Officer at Kingswood

Equity markets continued their upward trend last week, with global equities gaining 1.2% in local currency terms. Beneath the surface, however, the recovery has been a choppy affair of late. China and the technology sector, the big outperformers year-to-date, retreated last week whereas the UK and Europe, the laggards so far this year, led the gains.

As for US equities, they have re-tested, but so far failed to break above, their post-Covid high in early June and their end-2019 level. The recent choppiness of markets is not that surprising given they are being buffeted by a whole series of conflicting forces.

Developments regarding Covid-19 as ever remain absolutely critical and it is a mixture of bad and good news at the moment. There have been reports of encouraging early trial results for a new treatment and potential vaccine but infection rates continue to climb in the US. Reopening has now been halted or reversed in states accounting for 80% of the population.

We are a long way away from a complete lockdown being re-imposed and these moves are not expected to throw the economy back into reverse. But they do emphasise that the economic recovery, not only in the US but also elsewhere, is likely to prove a ‘stuttering’ affair.

Indeed, the May GDP numbers in the UK undid some of the optimism which had been building recently. Rather than bouncing 5% m/m in May as had been expected, GDP rose a more meagre 1.8% and remains a massive 24.5% below its pre-Covid level in February.

Even in China, where the recovery is now well underway, there is room for some caution. GDP rose a larger than expected 11.5% q/q in the second quarter and regained all of its decline the previous quarter. However, the bounce back is being led by manufacturing and public sector investment, and the recovery in retail sales is proving much more hesitant.

China is not just a focus of attention at the moment because its economy is leading the global upturn but because of the increasing tensions with Hong Kong, the US and UK. UK telecoms companies have now been banned from using Huawei’s 5G equipment in the future and the US is talking of imposing restrictions on Tik Tok, the Chinese social media platform. While this escalation is not as yet a major problem, it is a potential source of market volatility and another, albeit as yet relatively small, unwelcome drag on the global economy.

Government support will be critical over coming months and longer if the global recovery is to be sustained. This week will be crucial in this respect for Europe and the US. The EU, at the time of writing, is still engaged in a marathon four-day summit, trying to reach an agreement on an economic recovery fund.  As is almost always the case, a messy compromise will probably end up being hammered out.

An agreement will be positive but the difficulty in reaching it does highlight the underlying tensions in the EU which have far from gone away with the departure of the UK. Meanwhile in the US, the Democrats and Republicans will this week be engaged in their own battle over extending the government support schemes which would otherwise come to an end this month.

Most of these tensions and uncertainties are not going away any time soon. Markets face a choppy period over the summer and autumn with equities remaining at risk of a correction.

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