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LANDESK ACQUIRES LETMOBILE AND NEW APPLICATION WRAPPING SOLUTION

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LANDESK Acquires LETMOBILE And New Application Wrapping Solution

New technologies signal industry shift from mobile device-centered security to a user-oriented mobile approach

LANDESK are announcing its acquisition of LetMobile and the introduction of application wrapping technology. With this acquisition LANDESK is moving aggressively to assist enterprise IT and security teams to address modern user work styles by extending security from the mobile device itself to the content and applications.

Today’s workers no longer draw a distinction between work and personal computing environments. Professional and personal domains intersect throughout the day and into the evening, with little regard to time or place. This dynamic has cemented a new reality: corporate-issued devices get used for personal activities and personal devices are used for work. LANDESK believes this reality is driving a need for a new approach to enterprise mobility management – one with solid security fundamentals to protect businesses and ultimate flexibility to provide the experience users now expect.

LANDESK Acquires LETMOBILE And New Application Wrapping Solution

LANDESK Acquires LETMOBILE And New Application Wrapping Solution

“We are pleased to welcome LetMobile into the LANDESK family. Today’s actions represent significant progress towards our strategy as the global authority on user-oriented IT. It underscores our focus on delivering the latest innovations in mobile security,” said Stephen Daly, CEO of LANDESK. “By giving enterprise IT and security teams the ability to manage risk by securing mobile email, content and applications, while not getting in the way of users doing their jobs as efficiently as possible, we are helping our customers strike the perfect balance between user freedom and corporate responsibility.”

“Enterprise mobility management should no longer be viewed as a one-size-fits-all exercise. Users today have varying mobility requirements that depend on their specific role, work style, and location. The situations are different and the solutions need to be as well,” Daly added. “With the acquisition of LetMobile and the announcement of our application wrapping technology we are recognizingthat it is not about the device anymore; it is about the user, data, and apps.”

LetMobile Delivers New Paradigm for Securing Email, Content, and Apps

Today’s solutions for enterprise mobility typically require either a separate application or workspace for work content or for IT to retain full control over the device. These legacy approaches do not give users all the functionality they are used to with their native apps, and offer a disconnected experience when accessing personal and work data.

LetMobile recognized these traditional approaches to mobile IT security were out of sync with the way people live and work and that this disconnect is a source of frustration for users and IT alike. As a result of the acquisition, LANDESK is giving enterprise IT and security teams an innovative new architecture using a bidirectional secure mobile gateway that provides data protection for any mobile device.  Further, this gateway approach to security has been singled out by Forrester Research in its report TechRadar™: Enterprise Mobile Security, Q4 2013, as being primed for rapid adoption by enterprise customers. LetMobile’s secure mobile gateway provides extensible security options including mobile Data Loss Prevention (DLP), geofencing, auditing and profiling to ensure compliance and data security.

Innovative Approach to Secure Mobile Email

Email is the most used app for business and through LetMobile, LANDESK will provide customers with a powerful tool for mobile email protection. Using the secure mobile gateway, business email is provided through the native email app on any device, the same app that is used to access personal email with no need for a secure container. This gives users an unparalleled business email experience as it leverages the best mobile email apps that are offered by the leading device and mobile OS manufacturers.

Security is enforced from outside the device on the gateway level, preventing sensitive corporate data and user credentials from being stored locally on a mobile device. This minimizes the risk of data loss in the event a device is lost, stolen, infested or otherwise compromised.

Expanding Security from the Device to the Application

Organizations are increasingly developing mobile and Web apps to advance business processes. Enabling extended access to corporate networks and data from mobile devices raises significant data protection and compliance concerns for businesses. LANDESK now provides comprehensive security solutions to mobile enablement with the LetMobile secure gateway and a new app wrapping solution.

LetMobile’s secure mobile gateway also extends to Web apps, enabling secure access to content in corporate networks without requiring mobile device VPN or special browsers. This approach further reinforces the ability for users to be productive while enabling IT to protect business information.

LANDESK’s app wrapping solution adds a layer of security around both corporate and third-party applications ensuring a superior user experience. LANDESK is leveraging secure gateway technology to connect mobile apps to corporate resources and adding protections beyond what the apps provide including app VPN, data encryption, authentication, and data loss prevention.

Establishing an R&D Innovation Center in Israel

LANDESK plans to leverage the LetMobile team to establish and grow an innovation center in Israel that will continue to develop new and innovative technology to bring to market.

“The LANDESK and LetMobile visions for enterprise mobility management are well-aligned,” said Dror Todress, CEO of LetMobile.  “We are excited to join LANDESK in furthering this vision and extending our reach to enterprises around the world.”

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Dealing with the loneliness crisis with assistive technology

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Dealing with the loneliness crisis with assistive technology 1

By Karen Dolva, CEO and Co-Founder of NoIsolation

Humans are social beings, and for most children, school will be their most important social arena. Unfortunately, however, many children and adolescents with long-term illnesses are unable to attend school for extended periods, due to treatment plans, ill health or more recently due to the risk of infection. Research has shown that long-stints of school absence for children and adolescents with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME) and cancer can range from months to years.

These prolonged periods of absence, which often lead to limited interactions with other children and adolescents, can result in children completely losing their social network, leaving them feeling cut off, lonely and isolated, all as a result of something that is completely out of their control. What kind of consequences can this type of social isolation have for children and young adults?

In a recent in-depth investigation into the impact of COVID-19 on the emotional and educational development of British school-aged children, No Isolation partnered with independent researcher, Henry Peck, to look into the impact of COVID-19 on school aged children, to shed further light on the consequences of school closures, not only across the UK, but the long term effects that this can have on children and adolescents everywhere throughout the pandemic.

As a company working to abolish loneliness and isolation amongst those suffering with chronic illness, we were already aware of the effect that social isolation can have on a child’s educational development and mental health. For the investigation we collected responses from 1,005 parents and carers of 1,477 children spanning primary and secondary school.

Results of the study found that a concerning 76% of parents and carers reported that, since lockdown, they have become worried that their children are suffering from loneliness. Results also showed that parents and carers of 5-10-year-olds worry that their children are lonely often or all of the time, whilst parents and carers of 11-16-year-olds are concerned that their children are lonely at least some of the time. This is likely due to the fact that older children have greater access to social technologies, while younger children often rely on non-verbal forms of communication such as facial expression, physical contact, and through play, all of which is difficult to recreate whilst away from the school setting.

At No Isolation we are committed to creating solutions that will help children stay connected to their friends and their education, regardless of circumstance. We’ve seen first-hand the devastating impact that loneliness can have on a child, and know that children that can’t attend school don’t just miss out on learning, they miss out on friendships too. Losing this contact during the early years developmental stages can be devastating, leading to anxiousness and an increase in feelings of isolation. This report sheds light on the hundreds of thousands of young people that may not be able to rejoin their friends in school, and it is vital that they don’t fall through the cracks. We plan to continue researching the impact of this unprecedented pandemic and driving the conversation around how we, as a nation, can ensure the mental wellbeing and educational development of those most affected.

Loneliness has been found to have serious implications for both physical and mental health. People suffering from loneliness are 32% more likely to have a stroke and are 26% more at risk of early mortality. From No Isolation’s own research into the impact of school absence due to long-term illness, we have found that  children are particularly vulnerable to loneliness if they cannot attend school.

Researchers, Perlman and Peplau, define loneliness as a negative feeling, stating that a lonely person is experiencing a discrepancy between desired and actual social contact. Being socially isolated is not synonymous with being lonely, but there will often be a correlation between social isolation and loneliness. Though much empirical research on adults and adolescents shows a link between loneliness and depression, many studies have found that friendship-related loneliness is more explanatory for depressive symptoms among adolescents than parent-related loneliness. One possible explanation is that friends are the preferred source of social support during adolescence.

With that in mind, we should be both sad and alarmed by the high numbers of young people unable to attend school, and more so by the fact that we do not really know who they are or exactly why they cannot go to school. Research has shown that social isolation and loneliness often correlate with mental disorders, including depressive disorders, there are, however, options available for children and adolescents in the form of assistive technologies, enabling them to stay connected with education and their peers.

The provision of dedicated school staff, inspirational hospital schools, the use of avatars like AV1 that enable children to attend school remotely, are just a few of the ways that assistive technology and exemplary attitudes are helping children with long-term illnesses from becoming disconnected from essential social networks. There are also examples of individuals who are pushing to keep children from falling between the cracks and becoming invisible, such as Amy Dixon, who is running a petition that will do exactly that, bringing these issues to the attention of those who can make a real change. It is, and will be, thanks to these exemplary changes that more support is being offered to children that are virtually invisible across the UK at present.

However, not all children have the option to receive these kinds of provision. There are pockets of excellent practice driven on an individual and local level, but there needs to be systemic change at a policy level, to ensure everyone is supported.

Educational provision for children out of school due to illness appears to be something of a postcode lottery, with some families having to fight for 3 hours of home tuition a week, whilst others are offered 15 hours by default. This is thought to be, in part, due to the open statutory guidance which allows for flexible interpretation of government guidelines, as well as financial limitations schools and city councils face. To improve the lives and outcomes of this group of children, is to create a more accurate view and analysis. This can be done by joining up existing datasets, by asking better questions, and by building a model that predicts future numbers of children from falling outside of the system. This, in turn, will push the issue up the political agenda and drive much needed changes to statutory guidance. Most importantly, it would lead to more support for children that are seemingly invisible across the UK.

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Regulatory overlaps cause conflicts, confusion and complexity: is collaboration the answer?

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Regulatory overlaps cause conflicts, confusion and complexity: is collaboration the answer? 2

By Rob Fulcher, Head of Business – Americas, CUBE Global

Regulatory overlaps are an ongoing, perplexing and often time-consuming anomaly. They occur where multiple market regulators act disjointedly in their attempt to address a market failure, thereby imposing different regulatory requirements with contradictory or overlapping obligations. For financial institutions, this can be problematic: which regulation should take precedence? Will they face punitive action for neglecting one obligation in favour of another?

Following the global financial crisis of 2008, a swathe of new policies and acts came into force with a view to protecting the system and essentially preventing another market crash. Inevitably, this led to a host of new regulations, some of which created overlaps and inconsistencies. In turn, this leads to inefficiencies and misunderstandings as businesses endeavour to comply with all and every regulation, often finding themselves at a stand-off.

Financial institutions – especially the compliance team – are desperate for regulatory clarity. However, in many cases, it is not forthcoming. Regulatory clarity is not, it seems, high on the regulator’s agenda. A recent report by CUBE, RegTech for Regulatory Change, in association with Burnmark, explored the evolving landscape of regulatory overlaps. We now delve deeper into this topic to ask, ‘what is the solution?’

GDPR, PSD2 and MiFID II – to collect or protect data?

One notorious regulatory overlap that causes consistent headaches for financial institutions is that between GDPR and PSD2.

While GDPR gives individuals greater control over their data and restricts the freedoms of organisations to share it, PSD2 imposes data sharing requirements on financial service providers. It is up to the banks to ensure that correct policies and procedures are in place so as to comply with both pieces of legislation. This is not often an easy task considering their almost diametrically opposite aims.

The same can be said for the regulatory rules that surround both MiFID II and GDPR – two pieces of legislation filled with inherent contradictions. While the former focuses on consumer protection through transparency and retaining more information about the investor community; the latter is concerned with data protection and limiting the access to investor data if so desired by the owner of the data and giving investors the right to be forgotten.

Data privacy and AML – data sharing can only go so far

Data is a commodity – compared often to crude oil. For financial institutions, data is not only part of ongoing business functions, but it also holds potential for manipulation, misinformation or illicit activity. Surprisingly, the value of data has only truly been realised in recent years. In turn, we have seen a swathe of money laundering and data protection activity – leading to new and amended regulations to bolster data protections and simultaneously impose supervisory requirements to avoid money laundering. Global banks are finding it challenging to comply with one without compromising on the other.

Multinational banks often find themselves walking a tight rope between trying to meet data privacy requirements and simultaneously meeting those surrounding anti-money laundering (AML). For example, banks in the US are forbidden from sharing Suspicious Activity Reports (SARs) with foreign branch counterparts due to disclosure restrictions, thereby making it difficult to implement a group-wide compliance program.Regulatory overlaps cause conflicts, confusion and complexity: is collaboration the answer? 3

Regulatory overlap in the US

The US has a long-established, complicated and often fragmented regulatory structure. Significant and costly overlaps exist across the board, especially between the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) and the Federal Reserve System’s data collection activities, along with its supervision and examination activities. Consumer protection is conducted by six US regulators, which naturally results in overlaps, duplication and confusion.

 

Similarly, the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) and state securities regulators oversee securities and derivatives markets, leading to similar concerns of overlaps and fragmentation. Swaps and security-based swap products face the supervision of SEC and CFTC and market participants have made it known that this leads to significant market and operational challenges.

The answer

Regulatory overlap is not new – nor is there a clear solution. We have occasionally heard tales of compliance team members writing to regulators to request clarification, often to no avail. In the meantime, financial institutions must take steps to implement all relevant regulations where they can and mitigate risks where they are not able.

Regulatory technology (RegTech), especially automated change management platforms such as CUBE, highlight overlaps and alert compliance teams where issues or inconsistencies arise. For now, this is the most effective means of managing unclear regulations.

Ultimately, the answer lies with financial regulators themselves. While uncertainty exists, regulators must issue guidance and expectations in order to standardise approaches across the industry. The ideal outcome is undoubtedly founded in collaboration: regulators across sectors, industry and jurisdictions should collaborate to ensure that legislative changes are consistent and do not tread on the toes of the other. With the emergence of new technology – and related new regulation – many regulators are calling for a joined-up approach and looking to work together in their supervisory goals. Perhaps collaborative, unambiguous financial regulators aren’t so far away after all.

Author Bio:

Rob has 20 years’ experience in financial services sales and management. Following his early sales career at Euler Hermes, a global credit insurance business, Rob went on to establish a 15-year career in GRC. Initially working in London at Complinet, a compliance and risk business, Rob subsequently relocated to New York. In 2010, Complinet was acquired by Thomson Reuters and Rob played a pivotal role in growing GRC revenues, especially relating to regulatory change management. As Head of Sales Americas for CUBE Global, Rob re-built the sales team and consistently out-performed all other regions.

 

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Christmas isn’t cancelled; Santa now does click & collect

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Christmas isn’t cancelled; Santa now does click & collect 4

Despite fears that Christmas will be cancelled this year, new data from ACI Worldwide (NASDAQ: ACIW) finds that, with local lockdowns and social distancing measures in place across the UK, the Festive shopping season is starting earlier this year.

Based on analysis on hundreds of millions of eCommerce transactions around the globe, ACI’s latest eCommerce tracker predicts we will see a 27% increase in online shopping transactions. Along with a whopping 40% increase in click and collect purchases as consumers remain socially distant and local lockdowns continue.

Indeed, consumers acting as Santa’s little helpers have begun purchasing presents online even earlier than before to keep the Christmas dream alive. Concerns around limited product availability and delivery delays have seen online transactions increase by 21% in the last four weeks, when compared to the same period last year.

Amanda Mickleburgh, Director of Merchant Fraud Product at ACI Worldwide commented, “While Black Friday has typically been the starting line for the festive period, this year Prime Day sounds the klaxon. There are myriad reasons for this. With everyone encouraged to social distance and many areas of the UK now under even tighter local lockdowns, there’s more time than ever to browse online for presents. Added to this, many remember the severe delays in receiving purchases at the start of lockdown, and will be looking to avoid missing presents under the Christmas tree.

“Merchants should look to expand their same day shipping capabilities and provide free returns or extend T&Cs, to capitalise on this trend. Far from seeing physical stores as a lost cause, they should take advantage of the increase in demand for click and collect. And turn their stores into valuable real estate by expanding their click and collect capabilities.

However, there is a dark side to the holiday season kicking off earlier – fraud continues to increase as criminals take advantage of click and collect options and consumers start to buy higher-value items like the latest electronics. ACI’s analysis found that the value of attempted fraud increased from $7 to $9 per consumer this September compared to 2019.

Amanda Mickleburgh continued, “While click and collect is a major draw for consumers, merchants need to increase their fraud protection measures for this channel. As more merchants continue to offer this option to customers, there are greater opportunities for fraudsters to create a nightmare before Christmas.”

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