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INSEAD Celebrates 50 Years of Women Leading Academic Excellence

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INSEAD Celebrates 50 Years of Women Leading Academic Excellence

’50 Years, 50 Women, 50 Ideas’ represents 50 years of progress promoting gender diversity and 50 big ideas from its 50 notable female scholars

FONTAINEBLEAU, France, SINGAPORE, ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates, PRNewswire/ — INSEAD, the business school for the world, today unveiled 50 big ideas from 50 of its remarkable female academics through its 50 Years, 50 Women, 50 Ideas key initiative.

These ideas, from the school’s female faculty and doctoral alumnae, celebrate 50 years of INSEAD women leading academic excellence.

The initiative was launched in honour of the school’s year-long celebration of iW50, a campaign to mark the 50th anniversary of the first female graduates from the INSEAD MBAprogramme. For each year of action and progress toward gender diversity, 50 female academics from INSEAD share their big idea which encapsulates the essence of their thought-leading research.

Laurence Capron, Dean of Faculty at INSEAD and Professor of Strategy, says that, “These 50 women reflect the heart and soul of INSEAD’s academic environment: diversity in research and teaching methods, with no single school of thought predominant. They focus on what matters most, which is rigour and impact on management as a practice and a discipline. We are proud to celebrate their achievements and thought leadership.”

These female academics go beyond the boundaries of their disciplines, identifying areas in academic literature and business practice to answer some of the most pressing issues facing businesses. Many of them are also pioneering innovative learning methods.

A selection of Big Ideas from INSEAD female faculty members:

  • Annet Aris (Strategy): In a digitising world, boards will have to focus significantly more on understanding customers and delivering superior value.
  • Linda Brimm (OrganisationalBehaviour): Global Cosmopolitans experience a complex array of challenges and opportunities when living and working in multiple countries.
  • Laurence Capron (Strategy): Firms that diversify their growth strategies last longer than those using M&A alone.
  • Lily Fang (Finance): Women should learn from men and tap into their social networks.
  • Maria Guadalupe (Economics and Political Science): Anti-takeover provisions reduce firm value and do not give managers additional bargaining power to obtain a higher price in the takeover negotiation.
  • Zoe Kinias (OrganisationalBehaviour): Self-affirmation, achieved by reflecting on personal values, can eliminate gender gaps in business students’ performance.
  • Xiaowei Rose Luo (Entrepreneurship and Family Enterprise): Widely held cultural views shape securities analysts’ assessment of family firms.
  • Renee Mauborgne (Strategy): Lasting success comes not from battling competitors but from creating “blue oceans” — untapped new market spaces ripe for growth.
  • Erin Meyer (OrganisationalBehaviour): To decode how people think, lead, and get things done across the world is the greatest leadership challenge of the coming decades.
  • Jennifer Petriglieri (OrganisationalBehaviour): Labelling someone as a high-potential can thwart their development.
  • HilkePlassmann (Marketing): Marketing changes how products and services are perceived in the brain.

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Fall in UK economic activity bottoms out in February – PMI

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Fall in UK economic activity bottoms out in February - PMI 1

LONDON (Reuters) – British economic output stabilised in February after a sharp fall the month before, as many businesses continued to suffer from lockdown restrictions affecting hospitality and other face-to-face services, a closely watched survey showed on Wednesday.

Hours before finance minister Rishi Sunak is due to set out his economic plans for the coming year, the IHS Markit/CIPS composite Purchasing Managers’ Index gave a reading of 49.6 for February, up from an eight-month low of 41.2 in January.

The figure means businesses reported broadly stable activity for last month after a steep deterioration early in the year, and is little changed from an initial flash estimate of 49.8.

The PMI for the services sector alone rose to a four-month high of 49.5 in February from January’s eight-month low of 39.5, again in line with the initial flash estimate.

“Restrictions on travel, leisure and hospitality due to the national lockdown continued to curtail overall activity, but there were some pockets of growth in technology and business services,” financial data company IHS Markit said.

Britain entered its third national coronavirus lockdown in early January, closing schools, non-essential shops and most other businesses open to the public, though people can still travel to work if needed.

Last week Prime Minister Boris Johnson set out a path for easing the lockdown in England as vaccinations roll out rapidly. Schools will reopen next week but full restrictions on hospitality venues will not go until late June at the earliest.

Sunak is expected to set out further spending plans in a budget statement around 1230 GMT after providing almost 300 billion pounds of support during the past year.

Business optimism in the services PMI has risen to its highest since 2006 due to expectations of a return to normality. But many firms still reported difficulties from new, post-Brexit trading restrictions that took effect on Jan. 1.

(Reporting by David Milliken; Editing by Catherine Evans)

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Japan’s SMFG likely to halt all new lending to coal-powered plants, sources say

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Japan's SMFG likely to halt all new lending to coal-powered plants, sources say 2

By Takashi Umekawa

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan’s Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Group is likely to halt all new financing to coal-fired power plants, including the most efficient ones, two sources said, reflecting growing pressure from investors and environmentalists on Japan’s lenders to cut funding to coal.

While SMFG has said it would not finance new coal-fired power plants in principle, up until now it hasn’t ruled out funding projects seen as more environmentally friendly, such as so-called “ultra-supercritical (USC) power plants” that burn coal more efficiently than older designs.

It is now likely to remove that exception from its lending policy, meaning a complete halt to new finance for coal plants, said the sources, who declined to be named as the information is not public.

Japan’s biggest banks are under increasing pressure from global investors and environmental groups over their long involvement in funding coal projects. Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga has also pushed to achieve zero greenhouse gas emissions, on a net basis, by 2050.

“It’s a fact that the criticism from environmental groups has become so strong,” said one of the sources.

A spokesman for SMFG said nothing had been decided.

(Reporting by Takashi Umekawa; Editing by David Dolan and Edmund Blair)

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Oil rises as U.S. vaccine progress raises demand expectations

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Oil rises as U.S. vaccine progress raises demand expectations 3

By Shu Zhang

SINGAPORE (Reuters) – Oil prices rose on Wednesday as signs of progress in the COVID-19 vaccine rollout in the United States, the world’s biggest consumer, raised demand expectations.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures rose 15 cents, or 0.25%, to $59.90 a barrel by 0757 GMT, recovering from three days of losses.

Brent crude futures rose 24 cents, or 0.38%, to $62.94 a barrel after four days of losses.

“Ongoing stimulus measures, as COVID-19 vaccinations speed up, have boosted sentiment,” ANZ analysts wrote in a note.

The U.S. will have enough COVID-19 vaccine for every American adult by the end of May, President Joe Biden said on Tuesday after Merck & Co agreed to make rival Johnson & Johnson’s inoculation.

Futures were down earlier in the day amid uncertainty over how much supply the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and allies, together called OPEC+, will restore to the market at its Thursday meeting and a big build in U.S. crude inventories

The OPEC+ meeting on Thursday comes at a time when producers are generally positive on the oil market outlook compared with a year ago when they slashed supply to boost prices.

The market widely expects OPEC+ to ease production cuts, which were the deepest ever, by about 1.5 million barrels per day (bpd), with OPEC’s leader, Saudi Arabia, ending its voluntary production cut of 1 million bpd.

Still, an OPEC+ technical committee document reviewed by Reuters called “for cautious optimism,” citing “the underlying uncertainties in the physical markets and macro sentiment, including risks from COVID-19 mutations that are still on the rise”.

Reinforcing concerns of potential oversupply, the American Petroleum Institute industry group reported U.S. crude stocks rose by 7.4 million barrels in the week to Feb. 26, in stark contrast to analysts’ estimates for a draw of 928,000 barrels. [API/S]

However, that build occurred while U.S. refining capacity was shut during the survey week because of cold weather in Texas. Refinery runs fell by 1.75 million bpd, the API data showed.

“The recent selloff may help reinforce Saudi’s cautious stance and delay any production increase,” said Stephen Innes, global market strategist at Axi.

“It’s probably something that could sway the OPEC+ increase more back toward the 500,000 bpd as opposed to the 1.5 million bpd,” he said.

(Reporting by Shu Zhang and Sonali Paul; Editing by Gerry Doyle and Christian Schmollinger)

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