Connect with us

Top Stories

First-Party Fraud – The Rest of the Iceberg

Published

on

First-Party Fraud – The Rest of the Iceberg 1

By Martin Warwick, Principal Fraud Consultant, FICO

Most people associate fraud with stolen identities, counterfeit cards and account takeover. Now imagine a criminal so daring he or she walks into the bank to take out a loan under his or her real name — or a completely fictitious name.

Sound surprising? Welcome to the strange world of first-party fraud. What’s even stranger is that most experts say first-party fraud represents even bigger losses than traditional, third-party fraud. Industry analysts AITE estimate it cost the credit card industry alone $18.5 billion in 2012 and is on a trajectory to hit $28.6 billion by 2016.
Thwarted by better customer identification and verification checks, the criminal fraternity and casual opportunists are applying for credit in their own names, with their own credentials, but with malicious intent. Some of the underlying details may be misrepresented to achieve the provision of a bank account, a loan, social benefits, medical insurance coverage, etc., that the applicant would not otherwise have received.

And generally, the banks that are victimized don’t even know they’re dealing with fraud. This kind of fraud masquerades as bad debt, and frustrates collectors who are tasked with collecting from false or abandoned addresses, phone numbers and email accounts. When it comes to fraud, what’s identified today using traditional measures is just the tip of the iceberg.

Based on our work with clients across Europe, FICO estimates that 5-15% of bad debt write-offs in the UK are actually first-party fraud. The proportion is higher in Europe overall. In fact, FICO recently worked with NBKI, Russia’s biggest credit bureau, to launch a new scorecard that will detect fraudulent credit applications — and the damage done by first-party fraud is so great, that this scorecard is tuned specifically to first-party fraud.

Criminal rings perpetrate first-party fraud, and the problem is by no means confined to Europe. In February this year, the FBI cracked a massive international credit card fraud case that involved using thousands of phony identities to obtain tens of thousands of credit cards. Confirmed losses were $200 million, but estimates are rising.
But individuals with no criminal ties may also defraud banks, particularly when they feel disenfranchised by a punishing economy. Borrowers that are strapped for cash may view a personal loan as a last-ditch source of funds, even if they can’t or won’t repay it. They may even have heard stories about others getting away with such methods, encouraging them to try it themselves.

First-party fraud is notoriously hard to prove, as differentiating it from bad debt can often hinge on proving the customer’s intent to repay or default. And there is no one pattern. In fact, FICO has identified several different patterns:

  • Hit & Run: Takes the money (say by maxing out a new credit card) in the shortest time possible and disappears
  • Sleeper: Plays the game for a while first, using the bank’s own money to make small payments and simulate normal account activity, then maxes out overdraft and credit cards and disappears. This is often carried out by groups of criminals
  • Bust Out: Behaves responsibly over a significant time period, then goes on a spending spree and changes address to avoid being traced
  • Sell-On: ’Sells’ account details to fraudster, often for financial gain

After a customer is delinquent, it can be tricky to identify whether or not he or she intends to commit fraud, but there are some signs that lenders can look out for. Focus on detecting suspicious activity, potentially abusive patterns and hidden connections and relationships in the vast amount of transactional data that banks own across different accounts and customer relationships.

But there is a way to hit back. Applying sophisticated analytics to bolster traditional on-boarding identity and “know your customer” defences, and combining this risk-weighted output with advances in decision management, rules management and investigative workflows, allows organizations from any sector to get a more precise view on what is traditional identity theft and third-party fraud, but also for the first time to gain insight into those who are demonstrating elements of first-party fraud.

In fact, there are opportunities to detect first-party fraud all across the account lifecycle – from the application stage onward. With credit card accounts, alarm bells should be ringing if a new borrower defaults on their first repayment. Going over the credit limit – especially by more than 30%– can also be an indicator of fraudulent intent. For loan customers, banks should look out for those who pay back less than five per cent of the loan amount before defaulting.

Bankers in many parts of Europe are waking up to the threat of first-party fraud, and exploring solutions that will give them the same calibre of protection afforded by “traditional fraud” solutions. FICO recently launched an application fraud solution that searches for both third-party and first-party fraud. What was once the “hidden” problem of fraud is finally stepping into the light.

Martin Warwick advises FICO clients across Europe on fraud management. He recently developed the commentary for FICO’s card fraud map of Europe (www.fico.com/fraudeurope). For more discussions of first-party fraud, check out the FICO Banking Analytics Blog (http://bankinganalyticsblog.fico.com).

First-Party Fraud Detection – Potential Triggers

 

 

Top Stories

Pandemic risks eclipse treasury priorities as businesses diversify investments to mitigate impact

Published

on

Pandemic risks eclipse treasury priorities as businesses diversify investments to mitigate impact 2

The Covid-19 pandemic has shunted aside existing challenges to sit atop treasurers’ priority lists, according to “The resilient treasury: Optimising strategy in the face of covid-19”, a survey run by the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) and sponsored by Deutsche Bank.

The results show that treasurers are looking to diversify their investments in a bid to mitigate the pandemic impacts, including heightened liquidity, foreign-exchange and interest-rate risk. As many as 55% plan to increase investments in long-term instruments, with 48% increasing investments in bank deposits, another 48% in local investment products, and 47% in money-market funds.

“The Covid-19 pandemic has drastically altered business plans in 2020. It has placed a certain level of strain on treasury processes, but the challenge it presents has been managed by traditional treasury skills. It is clear that pandemic risk will be on the treasury checklist for years to come, but it is one of many risks the department faces and will continue to manage,” says Melanie Noronha, the EIU editor of the report.

Despite Covid-19 looming large, other challenges wait in the wings. Notably, the replacement of the London Interbank Offered Rate was identified by 38% of respondents as the main challenge of their function.

Technology, meanwhile, continues to be a pressing issue, with treasury teams becoming increasingly reliant on IT solutions. Here, data quality is rising up the list of concerns. Already highlighted as very or somewhat concerning in 2019 by 69% of respondents, the figure rose to 78% in 2020. Acquiring the necessary skill sets to realise the full benefits of this data and technology is also a continuing priority – with some progress registered from last year. In 2020, 30% of respondents say they have all the skills they need to manage technological change, up from 22% in 2018.

“Treasury’s focus on technology is not only helping teams operate more efficiently in a remote-working environment, it has long played – and continues to play – a key role in realising their long-term priorities,” notes Ole Matthiessen, Head of Cash Management, Corporate Bank, Deutsche Bank. The survey shows that

Release 1 | 2  managing relationships with banks and suppliers (highlighted by 32% of respondents) and collaborating with other functions of the business (also 32%) remain top of the agenda – and seamless digital systems will help give treasurers the bandwidth and insight to be more effective partners for both internal and external stakeholders.

Based on a global survey of 300 treasury executives, conducted between April and May, the survey explores stakeholders’ attitudes among corporate treasurers towards the drivers of strategic change in the treasury function – from the pandemic through to regulation and technology – and their priorities for the next five years.

Continue Reading

Top Stories

Digital collaboration: Shaping the Future of Finance

Published

on

Digital collaboration: Shaping the Future of Finance 3

By Ryan Lester, Senior Director of Customer Experience Technologies at LogMeIn

With heightened economic uncertainty and increased customer expectation becoming the norm in the banking industry, it is understandable that the sector is struggling to keep afloat. Due to its precarious nature, banking institutions are trying their best to ensure they remain relevant in the competitive landscape and guarantee that their customers continue to be a priority.

When it comes to the first half of this year, the pandemic has shown how easy it is for industries to fail. Customers and companies alike had to get used to the new normal, as physical locations started to close. The banking industry felt this first hand, as banks were made to restructure how their business ran, with restricted opening hours and a wider push to motivate people to use online banking.

While some had already embraced digital options prior to the pandemic, this proved to be a stark contrast to the elderly population, who frequently visited branches to access their finances. Moving forward, banks have to adopt new methods to ensure customers get the most out of our their accounts, without their experience suffering.

Heightened Customer Expectations

When the pandemic reached its peak, people were encouraged to use online banking, as telephone contact was under strain with long waiting times and pressure mounting on contact centre agents. According to Fidelity National Information Services (FIS), which works with 50 of the world’s largest banks, there was a 200% jump in new mobile banking registrations in early April, while mobile banking traffic rose 85%.

With branches remaining closed, customers were continuously being urged to limit the amount of calls they made to the most urgent cases and consider whether they could solve their answers through mobile online banking or checking the company website. Although already being adopted in pockets of the industry, this was a real catalyst that spurred banks to up their game on digital channels and with self-service tools.

Banks are challenged with precariously balancing customer needs with the cost of personalised support. With the demographic of customers changing over the last few years, customers are becoming increasingly younger and more comfortable with technology. Influenced by the “Amazon Effect”, their expectations have raised to an all-time high, placing record strain on the sector

Customer experience isn’t just about support anymore, it’s about serving your customer at every point in the journey. Companies have an opportunity to elevate the experience they provide by moving beyond one-and-done interactions to create continuous engagements with their customers. It is starting to become a primary competitive differentiator in the market and one that doesn’t have a lot of variation. Deploying AI chatbot technology will be able to strategically help banks improve customer experience and raise the level of support that agents provide.

Digital collaboration: Working around the Clock

The benefits of adopting digital channels and self-service tools are second to none. By implementing chatbots, fuelled by conversational AI, banks will be able to help serve a wide range of customer queries and ensure they are protected from fraud and scams.

Ryan Lester

Ryan Lester

Conversational AI is exactly what it sounds like: a computer programme that engages in a conversation with a human. When it comes to service delivery, conversational AI can be deployed across multiple channels to engage with customers in ways that effectively address evolving customer needs. At a time defined by COVID-19, self-service tools such a conversational chatbots can work around the clock to solve customer queries in a concise and timely way. Of course, self-service tools won’t completely replace human agents in the banking industry, but they will help companies re-distribute customer traffic and workflows in ways that enhance customer experience. Self-service tools fuelled by conversational AI can also improve employee experience because service employees can handle fewer, but higher-level service tasks that chatbots might escalate to them.

Adopting new tools to help facilitate consistent and concise answers and help maintain customer experience is on the forefront of many industry minds. Banks such as the Natwest Group have seen this first-hand and are testament to the benefits that a good digital experience can provide. Simon Johnson, Capability Consultant, Digital at NatWest Group highlights NatWest’s use of digital tools during lockdown, “Over the last few months, we’ve learnt how to use digital tools to help our employees remotely. From a banking perspective, there have been a lot of changes including base rates, waive fees and the best ways of contacting our vulnerable customers, ensuring we keep them protected from frauds and scams.

“By introducing our Bold360 chatbot interface, Ella, we’ve been able to get relevant information out quickly, apply the best practice and ensure that our customer journeys are being developed correctly. Due to the volume of questions, some of our customers were finding themselves waiting longer than usual. So digital channels become essential to helping reduce the wait time. Using Bold360, we were able to mitigate issues and answer questions in a more timely way through our chatbot.

“Moving forward, as we open more digital services, we are analysing our data to see if customer will return back to their usual way of banking, now that they’ve seen what a good digital experience can provide. Either way, with Ella, we are ready.”

Chatbots and Humans: The Best Option for Customer Service

Over the last year, banking institutions have recognised the power that digital collaboration can have to their success. Delivering exceptional customer service and support is key for any business wanting to stay competitive in today’s market and banks are especially challenged with precariously balancing customer needs with the cost of personalised support. Leveraging the right technology, such as AI-powered chatbots, will enable the banking industry to provide better support and a more robust customer experience in the long term. Other institutions must follow suit, or risk becoming obsolete.

Continue Reading

Top Stories

A sleeping digital giant wakes? 4 key trends accelerating payments transformation in the US

Published

on

A sleeping digital giant wakes? 4 key trends accelerating payments transformation in the US 4

By Lauren Jones, International Payments Ambassador, Icon Solutions

The US payments industry is undoubtedly ripe for change. Before the unprecedented shock of COVID-19, digitization and payments transformation initiatives had been organic, piecemeal and predominately the preserve of the largest banks.

Now, increasing pressure means that financial institutions of all sizes are working to define a digital strategy to unlock new opportunities, drive business value, and stay competitive. But beyond the immediate impact of COVID, what underlying trends are accelerating digitization in the US?

  1. Real-time payments – the stimulus for change  

Real-time payments have been met with a degree of caution by US financial institutions. Risking traditional profit generators in return for potential revenues down the line is a gamble many have not been willing to take. But immediate payments are coming to the US whether banks like it or not.

Major payments infrastructure providers, including NACHA and The Clearing House (TCH), have moved to encourage immediate payment adoption in recent years. But the Fed, frustrated with a slow rate of progress, has announced that it is pressing ahead with the implementation of its FedNow system (despite significant industry objection). Although the Fed’s true intentions are open to interpretation and this may just be a play to accelerate private initiatives, it is a clear signal that they mean business.

This means holdouts risk their own ‘Kodak’ moment if they miss the huge opportunities in front of them by fixating on traditional revenue streams. Banks are in a position to support innovation across entire industries such as healthcare, which could be released from the constraints of paper-based bureaucracy and slow, expensive transactions.

Another opportunity that can be unlocked via instant payments is ISO 20022 (used in the TCH RTP system). It is the future of payments messaging standards and can greatly enhance various payments processes through increased data-carrying capabilities. More importantly given the current climate, citizens reliant on federal or state support can benefit from RTPs combined with additional data to immediately access emergency funds.

  1. The kids are growing up

The US is getting older. Consumers who were 10 when the iPhone first launched are now 23. This means we are seeing a ramp-up of digitally native Gen Z consumers (roughly those born between 1995 and 2010) accessing banking services.

Demographics are an inexact science and not perfect predictors (there are technophobe college students and 100-year-old Instagram influencers), but we can detect noticeable trends.

Younger customers don’t usually choose a bank because there is an ATM in their neighbourhood, a slightly better interest rate or an advert in the newspaper. Rather, a strong digital presence, personalised tools, rewards and experiences, and the trusted recommendations of friends and family, will have a more significant impact on customer acquisition.

Banks must look at the effect this will have on their longer-term digitalization strategy and be able to segment what this emerging customer base might want and how they will interact in years to come.

  1. Checkmate? Evolving corporate requirements

    Lauren Jones

    Lauren Jones

Corporate treasurers are people and their experience of seamless, immediate payments in their personal lives shapes expectations in the workplace. Although check usage for business-to-business (B2B) transactions is still the norm in the US and barriers remain, corporates are increasingly demanding the ability to transact in a real-time, omnichannel environment, 24×7.

The benefits are clear. Corporate treasurers stand to enjoy enhanced liquidity management and transparency, greater control over payments and enhanced data for reconciliation purposes. And for consumers, alternative digital payment options such as buy now pay later promote choice and flexibility.

  1. Increasing competition

A significant consequence of emerging consumer and business demand for digital offerings is the increase in competition from fintechs, technology giants and other third-parties. Traditionally, incumbent banks have enjoyed the advantage of consumer trust to offset more limited innovation. But as consumers become more comfortable entrusting their financial transactions to non-banks, banks must differentiate and digitize to remain competitive.

Data is where the technology giants excel, and their ability to personalise experiences and emotionally connect with their users is unprecedented. Banks need to learn from the positive aspects of this model to better understand their users and deliver meaningful, useful products and services.

For data to become the cornerstone of a banks’ customer relationship and take services to the next level, breaking the channel silos and extracting value from a comprehensive dataset will be decisive. But with only 18% of banks reporting that they are in the process of shifting from a transactional revenue model to a data-driven revenue model, this work has some way to go.

Taking customer propositions to the next level

Customers now expect services that work for them, not their banks. All banks, no matter the footprint, need to move quickly to offer a broad digital service platform that adds value to both the customer and the bank.

By defining a robust payments transformation strategy, banks of all sizes can remain fiercely competitive by rapidly lowering costs, unlocking revenues and promoting innovation

Continue Reading
Editorial & Advertiser disclosureOur website provides you with information, news, press releases, Opinion and advertorials on various financial products and services. This is not to be considered as financial advice and should be considered only for information purposes. We cannot guarantee the accuracy or applicability of any information provided with respect to your individual or personal circumstances. Please seek Professional advice from a qualified professional before making any financial decisions. We link to various third party websites, affiliate sales networks, and may link to our advertising partners websites. Though we are tied up with various advertising and affiliate networks, this does not affect our analysis or opinion. When you view or click on certain links available on our articles, our partners may compensate us for displaying the content to you, or make a purchase or fill a form. This will not incur any additional charges to you. To make things simpler for you to identity or distinguish sponsored articles or links, you may consider all articles or links hosted on our site as a partner endorsed link.

Call For Entries

Global Banking and Finance Review Awards Nominations 2020
2020 Global Banking & Finance Awards now open. Click Here

Latest Articles

Satisfaction with Credit Card Issuers in Canada Remains Flat Amid COVID-19, J.D. Power Finds 5 Satisfaction with Credit Card Issuers in Canada Remains Flat Amid COVID-19, J.D. Power Finds 6
Finance9 hours ago

Satisfaction with Credit Card Issuers in Canada Remains Flat Amid COVID-19, J.D. Power Finds

Tangerine Bank Ranks Highest in Overall Credit Card Customer Satisfaction for Second Consecutive Year With 73% of credit card customers...

The benefits of automated pension plans 8 The benefits of automated pension plans 9
Investing9 hours ago

The benefits of automated pension plans

While many people will prefer to speak to fellow human beings when discussing their investments, automation is already part of...

Pandemic risks eclipse treasury priorities as businesses diversify investments to mitigate impact 10 Pandemic risks eclipse treasury priorities as businesses diversify investments to mitigate impact 11
Top Stories9 hours ago

Pandemic risks eclipse treasury priorities as businesses diversify investments to mitigate impact

The Covid-19 pandemic has shunted aside existing challenges to sit atop treasurers’ priority lists, according to “The resilient treasury: Optimising...

Boost for consumers as banks recognise room for improvement on service and delivery 12 Boost for consumers as banks recognise room for improvement on service and delivery 13
Banking9 hours ago

Boost for consumers as banks recognise room for improvement on service and delivery

42% of banks are looking to improve service provision and boost customer satisfaction in the year ahead Less than half...

Trading Strategies 14 Trading Strategies 15
Trading12 hours ago

Trading Strategies

By Paddy Osborn, Academic Dean, London Academy of Trading Whether you’re negotiating a business deal, playing a sport or trading...

The impact of the Accounts Payable risk landscape 16 The impact of the Accounts Payable risk landscape 17
Finance12 hours ago

The impact of the Accounts Payable risk landscape

By David Thorley, Director of Customer Development, FISCAL Technologies The current economic climate has never been so uncertain. Not since...

The Viral Return On Investment 18 The Viral Return On Investment 19
Investing12 hours ago

The Viral Return On Investment

By Sabine Saadeh Author of Trading Love Investment Pitch It was around August 2018 when a friend of mine approached...

How AI and ML are changing insurance for good 20 How AI and ML are changing insurance for good 21
Technology13 hours ago

How AI and ML are changing insurance for good

By Alan O’Loughlin, Director of Analytics and Statistical Modelling, International and John Beal, Senior Vice President of Analytics at LexisNexis®...

How Assistive Learning Technology Is Making Online Learning Inclusive 22 How Assistive Learning Technology Is Making Online Learning Inclusive 23
Technology14 hours ago

How Assistive Learning Technology Is Making Online Learning Inclusive

By Sandra Goger is Learning Technology Analyst at Iflexion, Denver-based software development company. The global online learning market is expected...

Can your company data make you famous? 24 Can your company data make you famous? 25
Business14 hours ago

Can your company data make you famous?

By Kerry Gould, Associate Director, Speed Communications Businesses gather and generate reams of data every day on everything from purchasing...

Newsletters with Secrets & Analysis. Subscribe Now