ESCAPING THE WEALTH GAP CAN MEAN FLEEING HOMETOWNS

TAMMY WEBBER, Associated Press

DANVILLE, Ill. (AP) – Young people from struggling towns across the U.S. are finding a way to thrive – by moving.

With manufacturing’s decline and a widening wealth gap, the key to the middle class for many now is higher education and a willingness to relocate for work.

Census data show that higher-educated the workers move most often and farthest. Those who stay or have less education can be caught in the downward pull of struggling areas.

No comprehensive data contrast the fates of those who stay and those who leave, but there are partial glimpses.

WANT TO BUILD A FINANCIAL EMPIRE?

Subscribe to the Global Banking & Finance Review Newsletter for FREE
Get Access to Exclusive Reports to Save Time & Money

By using this form you agree with the storage and handling of your data by this website. We Will Not Spam, Rent, or Sell Your Information.
All emails include an unsubscribe link. You may opt-out at any time. See our privacy policy.

A survey of 2012 Michigan public university graduates, for example, found that 63 percent still lived in the state a year later. But those who moved were far more likely to have full-time jobs and earned significantly more.