Survey Data Reveals the Need for Improved Communication Between Patients and Healthcare Providers About Bacterial Vaginosis (BV), the Most Common Gynecologic Infection in the U.S.

According to an online survey, although healthcare providers (HCPs) report sharing crucial information on bacterial vaginosis (BV) with patients, the associated risks of the condition remain a mystery to many women, indicating a significant disconnect.1 With BV known to be the most prevalent gynecologic infection in the U.S., affecting 21 million women each year, 2 its clear that further education is needed to bridge this gap in communication and help women to obtain diagnosis and treatment initiation sooner.

Lupin Pharmaceuticals Inc., the U.S. wholly owned subsidiary of Lupin Limited, dedicated to delivering high-quality medications trusted by healthcare providers and women across many treatment areas, has partnered with the American Sexual Health Association (ASHA) and the National Association of Nurse Practitioners in Women’s Health (NPWH) to conduct a two-pronged national online survey among women who have been diagnosed with BV and HCPs who treat women with the condition. Survey findings were presented at the 21st Annual NPWH Premier Womens Healthcare Conference in San Antonio, TX, from October 10-13, 2018.

The incidence of BV is staggering “ we know that one in three women will get BV at some point in her life, yet the condition often goes undiagnosed, says Brooke Faught, nurse practitioner and clinical director of the Women’s Institute for Sexual Health (WISH) in Nashville, TN. As providers, we believe that were sharing vital information about BV with our patients, yet these survey findings demonstrate the need to ensure that patients not only understand the symptoms, but the significant risks associated with this most common gynecologic infection.

If left untreated, BV can increase the risk of contracting sexually transmitted diseases, including chlamydia, gonorrhea, herpes, trichomoniasis and HIV. Untreated BV can also increase the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), which may affect fertility; it also can lead to pre-term birth and low birth weight.3 Yet less than half of women with BV (43 percent) report that they are aware that untreated BV can cause an increased risk of STDs, and even fewer (38 percent) are aware that it can lead to an increased risk of early labor or birth.1 The impact is notable “ three quarters (76 percent) would have seen their HCP sooner if they were aware of the risks associated with untreated BV.1

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Despite the fact that BV is the most common gynecologic infection, it often goes undiagnosed, so women dont get the necessary treatment. Due to the risk factors associated with untreated BV, immediate diagnosis and treatment is of high importance, says Nick Hart, President, Specialty, Lupin Pharmaceuticals, Inc. By presenting the survey data, we hope to shine a light on the gap between what HCPs believe theyre sharing with patients and the information that patients are actually taking away. If we can close that gap by encouraging a more productive dialogue, we can help shorten the path to diagnosis and treatment.

While most patients (63 percent) say their HCP discussed general information about BV, far fewer (34 percent) say they discussed the risks associated with BV if left untreated.

The issues uncovered by the survey dont end with patient-HCP communication; the survey also identified the issue of treatment adherence with some patients. While most patients report using their treatment as prescribed (90 percent for those who used an oral antibiotic; 87 percent for those who used vaginal cream), nearly three in 10 (29 percent) who have used prescription BV treatments feel the currently available therapies for BV are very difficult to complete. However, the vast majority of women with BV (91 percent) would be open to trying new treatment options for BV.1

The results demonstrate the need for clearer and more open dialogue between HCPs and patients to not only facilitate prompt treatment, but also to encourage treatment compliance, concludes Faught. Additionally, HCPs must stay informed about less cumbersome treatment options that may help patients adhere.

For more information, visit www.KeepHerAwesome.com, a resource that provides women and healthcare professionals with information on BV, downloadable fact sheets, discussion guides, and additional patient and practice resources.

About the Survey

The patient survey was conducted online by Harris Poll on behalf of Symbiomix Therapeutics, LLC, a Lupin Company, and the American Sexual Health Association (ASHA) within the United States between September 14 and 29, 2017 among 304 U.S. women aged 18 to 49 who have been diagnosed by a healthcare professional with bacterial vaginosis (BV) within the past 2 years (women with bacterial vaginosis). Figures for age, income, race/ethnicity, region, education, and size of household were weighted where necessary to bring them into line with their actual proportions in the population.

The healthcare professional survey was conducted online by Harris Poll on behalf of Lupin Pharmaceuticals Inc., and the National Association of Nurse Practitioners in Women’s Health (NPWH) within the United States between March 1-15, 2018 among 150 OB/GYNs and 151 nurse practitioners board certified in womens health (NPs) or OB/GYN physician assistants (PAs) who see an average of 20 or more women with BV in a month. OB/GYN results were weighted for gender by years in practice and region and NP/PA results were weighted for age by sex, income, race/ethnicity, region, education and occupation where necessary to bring them into line with their actual proportions in the population.

About the American Sexual Health Association

The American Sexual Health Association (ASHA) is a not-for-profit organization founded in 1914 to improve the health of individuals, families, and communities, with a focus on educating about and preventing sexually transmitted diseases. ASHAs educational web sites include: www.ashasexualhealth.org, www.iwannaknow.org (teen site), and www.quierosaber.org (Spanish language site).

About National Association of Nurse Practitioners in Women’s Health (NPWH)

The National Association of Nurse Practitioners in Women’s Health’s mission is to ensure the provision of quality primary and specialty health care to women of all ages by women’s health nurse practitioners and other women’s health-focused advance practice registered nurses. NPWH seeks to increase women’s wellness and health outcomes, decrease health disparities affecting women, enhance women’s access to and knowledge of health resources, and protect and promote women’s rights to make choices regarding their health within the context of their personal beliefs. NPWH serves advanced practice registered nurses by providing education and resources to increase clinical competencies, advocating for health care policies that support women and APRNs, collaborating with interprofessional strategic partners, and fostering evidence-based practice in women’s health through research. More information is available at www.npwh.org.

About Lupin Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Lupin Pharmaceuticals, Inc. is the U.S. wholly owned subsidiary of Lupin Limited, and is the 4th largest pharmaceutical company in the U.S. based on prescriptions filled. Together, all Lupin-owned entities combine to make up the 7th largest pharmaceutical company in the world in total sales. Lupin Pharmaceuticals, Inc. is dedicated to delivering high-quality medications trusted by healthcare professionals and women across many treatment areas. Lupin Pharmaceuticals Inc.s branded pharmaceuticals division, headquartered in Baltimore, MD, is the provider of numerous products designed to help prevent and manage womens health conditions with serious health consequences.

2018 Lupin Pharmaceuticals, Inc. All rights reserved.

REFERENCES

1. Data on file. National online patient survey “ Bacterial vaginosis, conducted by Harris Poll. Baltimore, MD: Lupin Pharmaceuticals, Inc. October 2017. 2. Koumans EH, Sternberg M, Bruce C, et al. The prevalence of bacterial vaginosis in the United States, 2001-2004; associations with symptoms, sexual behaviors, and reproductive health. Sex Transm Dis. 2007;34(11):864-869. 3. Centers for Disease Control (CDC). (2017). Bacterial Vaginosis “ CDC Fact Sheet. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/std/bv/stdfact-bacterial-vaginosis.htm. Accessed September 27, 2018.

Media:
Lupin Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Alana Rockland,
646-503-2732
M: 301-537-5392
[email protected]

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